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NEW! Download the Illuminate training guide, "Counseling LGBTQ Adults Throughout the Life Span,”
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  Thursday | June 8  

12:00 noon – 5:00 pm
Registration Opens

Registration Desk - Level 3B

5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Opening Reception

Cabinet - Level 1B


  Friday | June 9  

7:30 am – 8:30 am
Continental Breakfast

Constitution - Level B

8:00 am – 5:00 pm
Registration Open

Registration Desk - Level 3B


Opening Keynote  

9:15 am – 10:15 am
Opening Session and Keynote

Colleen Logan, PhD
Room: Constitution A


Education Sessions

10:30 am – 11:20 am
ID #101, Room: Burnham
Trauma-Informed Care Across the Life Span for LGBTQI+ Individuals
Educational Session
Gerard Lawson, Jyotsana Sharma, Brandy Smith
Trauma does not discriminate, and yet LGBTQI+ individuals experience trauma and violence at higher rates than straight and cisgender individuals (Roberts, Austin, Corliss, Vandermorris, & Koenen, 2010). Moreover, there is potential for treatment providers to retraumatize clients. This session will explore challenges facing LGBTQI+ clients, and the presenters will introduce how trauma-informed care strategies can support clients and avoid retraumatization. The presenters will discuss strategies for helping to position LGBTQI+ clients for progress in counseling and potentially for posttraumatic growth. Applications and strategies for clients across the life span will be presented.


10:30 am – 11:20 am
ID #102, Room: Latrobe
Beyond Coming Out: Working With LGBT Clients in Latter Stages of Identity Development
Educational Session
Richard Tyler-Walker
Understanding the process of identity development is crucial for counselors to be able to work effectively with LGBT clients. The invisible nature of this marginalized identity also presents unique challenges to counselors. Focus is often given on clients at early stages of identity development and coming out. This session will focus on understanding theories around identity development, with an emphasis on the therapeutic needs of clients in later stages of development. The session will focus on clients who reach a status of foreclosure after self-acceptance and coming out that prevents them from achieving a stage of identity synthesis. Also, the intersectionality of other identities and their potential impact on identity development will be addressed. This session will deepen attendees’ understanding of issues present and intervention strategies with their LGBT clients. This interactive session will be didactic in nature and illustrated through rich case examples.


10:30 am – 11:20 am
ID #103, Room: Bulfinch
Mentoring Our Students Academic and Identity Connection (MOSAIC): A Program to Address Students’ Educational and Professional Goals Educational Session
Educational Session
Kara Ieva, Kristina Weiss
Come learn about a unique program initially developed for college students but which can be tailored to K-12 schools. The MOSAIC program aims to support students to develop academically, professionally, and personally through mentoring/counseling focused on the intersection of identity and education. The program’s main goal is to facilitate mentoring/counseling sessions that include students’ various identities as they relate to their educational and professional goals. This presentation will detail the logistics from creating a program to implementation and evaluation, including partner organizations, specific training of mentors/ counselors, progress notes, evaluation, and key elements of supervision. Specific cases will be discussed, as well as how to scale down to the K–12 levels.


10:30 am – 11:20 am
ID #104, Room: Renwick
If You See Something, Say Something: Responding to Student and Supervisee Microaggressions
Educational Session
Anita A. Neuer Colburn, John Marszelek, Kevin Snow, Mary Aab
Counselor educators and supervisors train students and supervisees to become professional, ethical, and competent counselors. However, some trainees are adamantly against working with LGBT people, some are insensitive about their language, and others don’t understand the inappropriate nature of their jokes. In this panel discussion, LGBTQQIA counselor educators and supervisors will discuss their own responses to slanderous speech, microaggressions, and overt ridicule regarding LGBTQQIA persons by students and supervisees. The presenters will talk about their own emotional reactions and how they’ve changed over time, along with helpful and unhelpful responses to students/ supervisees based on their own developmental level. Each panelist will briefly discuss one aspect of his or her experience, and they will then facilitate a discussion with attendees around best practices for managing emotional reactions while still offering appropriate responses to students and supervisees.


10:30 am – 11:20 am
ID #105, Room: Arlington
Life on the Margins: Intersecting LGBTQIA and Disability
Educational Session
Shannon Solie, Lori Magnuson
Cultural, institutional, and individual oppressions leave the people who are impacted feeling stigmatized and marginalized. People with disabilities and members of the LGBTQIA community are often affected by significant levels of oppression. When these identities intersect, the result can lead to life as an overwhelming and othering experience. This session will assist attendees in working with clients to identify levels of oppression in their lived experience. Helping name the phenomenon of othering and disempowerment that individuals living on these margins experience can create an opportunity for exploration to increase client empowerment and self-advocacy skills. Using discussion and case examples, attendees will examine the four-level model of oppression and the ethical obligations toward continual learning, personal reflection, and cultural humility in serving clients with intersecting identities.


11:30 am – 12:20 pm
ID #106, Room: Burnham
LGBTQ+ for Counselor Educators: Strategies for Creating Affirming Environments
Educational Session
Robtrice Brawner
While colleges and universities have become increasingly more aware of the need and benefit of creating and maintaining diverse college environments, the question remains: Are they effective in making students feel welcome and included? This session will explore the LGBTQ+ community in counselor education and define affirming and nonaffirming environments. The main focus will be on strategies counselor educators can incorporate in the academic setting to create an affirming environment for LGBTQ+ individuals. These strategies are designed to improve the retention of LGBTQ+ students and improve the multicultural competence of all students. Through the use of small group activities, video, and case scenarios, attendees will leave the session not only with an enhanced understanding of affirming and nonaffirming environments but also with strategies to help establish and maintain affirming academic environments for the LGBTQ+ community.


11:30 am – 12:20 pm
ID #107, Room: Latrobe
Trans Men: Exploring Sexual and Gender Identity Issues
Educational Session
William Baker
Separating the “T” from LGBTQ, this presentation will focus on the case histories of trans men, their journeys through transition, and how their sexual and gender identities may have changed throughout that process. Results of a qualitative research study will be presented using interviews from the participants, concluding with an interactive discussion on the fluidity of sexual orientation, gender identity, and how these trans men view male privilege. Attendees will be encouraged to move away from the traditional “binary” or dichotomous divisions of male/female, gay/straight, and heteronormative views of the world and other people. Counselors need to be aware that many people, especially in the transgender community, view themselves as neither male nor female, gay nor straight, but rather as genderqueer. These trans persons see themselves as somewhere on the spectrum of gender identity.


11:30 am – 12:20 pm
ID #108, Room: Bulfinch
Resiliency Factors of Trans* College Students: Implications for Professional Counselors and Higher Education Professionals
Educational Session
Jane E. Rheineck, Matthew E. Lonski
This session will examine the resiliency factors and the strategies transgender (trans*) college students use to navigate gender-dichotomous collegiate environments. The multiple intersections of college trans* students and their various social identities are highlighted as well as the importance of coping strategies for a successful college experience. One of the presenters identifies as trans* and will share his insights as well as provide firsthand suggestions that will inform and assist college counselors, student affairs professionals, faculty, and administrators working with college trans* students. Additional recommendations such as the (un)learning of normative gender constructs, the use of appropriate language in the curricula, and suggestions for providing a safe environment inside and outside the classroom will also be explored. Affirmative- and resilience-based counseling and“helping” approaches for working with trans* college students will conclude this session.


11:30 am – 12:20 pm
ID #109, Room: Renwick
Working With Latin@ LGBTQI Young Adults: The Intersectionality of Culture, Religion, Sexual Orientation, and Sexual Identity
Educational Session
Tiphanie Gonzalez
For many in the Latin@ community, counseling is still considered taboo, as is the acceptance of LGBTQI persons by friends and family (Human Rights Committee, 2017). This session will discuss the intersections of culture, religion, sexual orientation, and sexual identity in the Latin@ community. Specifically, the presenter will discuss the needs of college aged young adults and personal identity development. This session will explore these intersections through the lens of Chickering’s Seven Vectors (Chickering & Reisser, 1993), Cass’ Homosexuality Identity Formation Model (1979, 1984), and Torres Model of Hispanic Identity Development (1999, 2003).


11:30 am – 12:20 pm
ID #110, Room: Arlington
Transgender: Moving From Awareness to Advocacy
Educational Session
Becca Smith
The session uses PowerPoint technology to overview and summarize the transgender population. The definition of transgender, which will include gender identity and genderqueer, will be explained. This session will also discuss how to best serve the transgender community in a counseling capacity. This will include supporting them psychologically, helping with campus resources, and navigating referrals for medical issues, including hormone therapy and possible gender affirming surgery. Attendees will be provided examples of how to write a support letter for hormone therapy and gender affirming surgery using the Standards of Care from WPATH. The session will explain the challenges this population faces, especially with the political issues in the media. Attendees will acquire an overall increased competency to work with the transgender population in a counseling setting.


Lunch

12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Cabinet & Declaration AB
(Declaration Level 1B)

1:40 pm – 2:30 pm
ID #111, Room: Burnham
Coming Out at Midlife: Strengths-Based Counseling Implications and Strategies
Educational Session
Leslie Kooyman
LGBT individuals coming out at midlife face unique psychosocial issues as this baby boomer generation navigates family, relationships, dating, and health. While competencies exist for LGBT populations, they tend to focus on younger LGBT populations. This interactive session will explore the varied psychosocial issues facing midlife LGBT populations. Counseling implications and strategies for exploring relationships, dating, sex, coming out, family, and health care will be provided.


1:40 pm – 2:30 pm
ID #112, Room: Latrobe
Serving the Needs of LGBTQ Clients: The State of Civil Rights Protections in Schools and the Workplace; Advocating for LGBTQ Students and Clients
Educational Session
Amy Zavadil
For several decades, civil rights-based protections for LGBTQ-identified individuals were increasingly solidified through case law, federal guidance, and legislation. Through the lens of Title IX, college student affairs, and other equity issues resources, the presenter will discuss how counselors can support their students and clients through awareness of legal and policy protections in school and workplace. Identifying the available legal rights and resources that can support client advocacy, whether in a school or agency setting, is vital to the focused empowerment by counselors that encourage client self-advocacy.


1:40 pm – 2:30 pm
ID #113, Room: Bulfinch
Life on the Margins: Intersecting LGBTQIA and Disability
Educational Session
Shannon Solie, Lori Magnuson
Cultural, institutional, and individual oppressions leave the people who are impacted feeling stigmatized and marginalized. People with disabilities and members of the LGBTQIA community are often affected by significant levels of oppression. When these identities intersect, the result can lead to life as an overwhelming and othering experience. This session will assist attendees in working with clients to identify levels of oppression in their lived experience. Helping name the phenomenon of othering and disempowerment that individuals living on these margins experience can create an opportunity for exploration to increase client empowerment and self-advocacy skills. Using discussion and case examples, attendees will examine the four-level model of oppression and the ethical obligations toward continual learning, personal reflection, and cultural humility in serving clients with intersecting identities.


1:40 pm – 2:30 pm
ID #114, Room: Renwick
Sweet T and Advocacy: Creating Sustainable Trans-Inclusive Services in Traditionally Conservative Areas
Educational Session
Natalie Beck, Kelli Lasseter
This session will provide professional development, resource-sharing, and networking for those with professional and/or student roles supporting LGBTQ people on college and university campuses in the southern United States. Although this session has broad applicability across campus advocacy, it will also address some of the challenges, unique possibilities, and demonstrated successes of advancing this work in an environment that has historically been characterized by geographic and cultural struggle. This session will introduce the cross-collaboration strategies that have been effectively utilized by Alabama campuses to create policy and procedure related to sustainable trans* inclusive health care, including the development of a Gender Transition Interdisciplinary Team, the formation and maturation of a student-driven support group, and the mapping of community assets that are necessary for success in this work in the South. This session will offer attendees the opportunity to assess their own campuses and develop strategies for achieving goals they identify.


1:40 pm – 2:30 pm
ID #115, Room: Arlington
Lesbian and Bisexual Identity and Eating Disorders Recovery
Educational Session
Ioana B. Marcus, Caitlin Wordham, Carolyn Raufer, Ron Belotti
Eating disorders impact the lives of lesbian and bisexual women at similar rates as their heterosexual counterparts. Their sexual/affectional orientation and identity will become an integral part of understanding and treating the eating disorder. This session will address statistics, patterns, contributing factors, protective factors, various interventions supported in the literature, and advocacy tools. A brief case study will provide attendees with an opportunity to apply the learned concepts.


2:40 pm – 3:30 pm
ID #116, Room: Burnham
Ethical and Legal Considerations: Complicated Issues in Challenging Times
Educational Session
Stephanie Dailey
Over the past decade, conscience objections have surfaced in the public arena, raising questions as to whether counselors may legally refuse services to LGBTQ+ clients due to a counselor’s personally held beliefs. These laws not only deny services to LGBTQ+ clients but also are in direct violation of the ACA Code of Ethics (2014). In addition to values-based referrals, this session will address other challenging and complex ethical and legal issues all counselors, particularly those working with LGBTQ+ adults, need to know.


2:40 pm – 3:30 pm
ID #117, Room: Latrobe
The Nuances and Complexities of Group Work With Transgender, Gender Nonconforming, and Nonbinary Communities
Educational Session
Christian D. Chan, Deanna N. Cor
Best practices of the counseling profession have demonstrated a commitment to culturally responsive practices (Singh & Salazar, 2010) and ethical responsibilities (Goodrich & Luke, 2010) for historically marginalized communities. Although the history of legislation, advocacy, and counseling practices for the LGBTQ+ community at-large has evolved, issues surrounding gender identity, diversity, and marginalization have been subsumed into larger advocacy movements, which contribute to invisibility and erasure for transgender, gender nonconforming, and nonbinary communities. Adding to this complexity, group work accounts for the variability of factors influencing group cohesion and group processes, yet offers transformative experiences in meaning and wellness reified by empowerment and community. Subsequently, group work offers unique environments for trans, gender nonconforming, and nonbinary individuals to engage in relationships, process personal and systemic oppression, and experience healing. Synthesizing conceptual and empirical literature, the presenters will provide recommendations, engage relevant practices through collaborative dialogue, and experiential activities to implement skills.


2:40 pm – 3:30 pm
ID #118, Room: Bulfinch
Counseling Tools to Encourage Safe Virtual Community for LGBT* Teens
Educational Session
LoriAnn Sykes Stretch, Lora Pilcher
LGBT* teens are high risks for suicide, isolation, bullying, and solicitation. Often teens will withdraw from live social interaction for fear of rejection and judgment and seek out relationships through virtual communities. Virtual communities can provide a false sense of security and trust, leaving LGBT* teens vulnerable. The presenters will share information on how teens are being targeted and harmed so that counselors can help educate both LGBT* teen clients and their support systems of the risks of the virtual world. They will then share positive virtual community resources and technologies to help protect teens and their families.


2:40 pm – 3:30 pm
ID #119, Room: Renwick
Working at the Intersections: Moving Beyond the One Lens Approach to Counseling LGBTQ Clients
Educational Session
Courtland C. Lee, Deneen Robin, Shelli Berman
Multicultural counseling generally examines LGBTQ client concerns almost exclusively through the lens of sexual orientation. In reality, LGBTQ client identity is not unidimensional but rather develops and is expressed as a series of intersections and interactions among multiple aspects of identity. This session will present ideas on how to“work at the intersections” when counseling LGBTQ clients. Participants will be able to engage in an assessment of LGBTQ client issues by examining multiple personal identities within a cultural context and reflect on the nature the intersections of their own multiple personal identities and how to apply them in their own counseling practice.


2:40 pm – 3:30 pm
ID #120, Room: Arlington
Health and Health Care Access Challenges Experienced by LGBT Older Adults: What Counselors Should Know
Educational Session
Marcela Kepic, Vivian Lee
Older adults face many adversities, especially those who have been marginalized due to their sexual orientation. Affected by discrimination, many LGBT older adults experience isolation and depression, among other health challenges. This session will provide information related to health and health care access challenges experienced in LGBT older adults. Moreover, end-of-life issues pertaining to LGBT will be discussed, and cultural competencies for working with LGBT older adults will be presented.


3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
ID #121, Room: Burnham
Clinical Supervision: Power, Privilege, and Intersectionality and its Impact on Building a Working Alliance
Educational Session
Monica Osburn, Sam Pranger, Richard Tyler-Walker
This session will focus on addressing diversity issues related to LGBTQ+ identity in supervision, particularly as they relate to power, privilege, intersectionality, and expectations of supervisory experiences. Research suggests that discussion of similarities and differences in the initial stages of supervision leads to increased overall satisfaction for LGTBQ+ identified supervisees. However, research also shows that these discussions do not occur frequently and are often introduced by the supervisee, not the supervisor. This presentation will expand on how supervisors can bring difference into the room when the supervisor and/or supervisee identify as LGTBQ+. The presenters will discuss intersecting identities, human development, and supervisory development, and how these various dynamics manifest in supervision. The session will demonstrate how supervisors can navigate initial conversations around difference and identity so that a positive working alliance can form. The presenters will provide space for attendees to share their own experiences or explore questions around intersecting identities.


3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
ID #122, Room: Latrobe
De Opresso Liber, Part II: Counseling and Advocating for Trans Military Service Members During Uncertain Times
Educational Session
Deanna N. Cor, Megan J. Doughty Shaine
Following up a presentation at the 2017 ACA Annual Conference and Expo, this educational session will provide attendees with contextually informed strategies for working with and advocating for trans* military service members and veterans during an uncertain time. In 2016, the Pentagon ended the ban on trans* people serving openly in the U.S. military; however, recent moves by the Trump Administration leave trans* service members feeling uncertain and fearful about their future. All counselors must be prepared for those service members, in the face of this uncertainty, to continue to seek services outside of the military. The presenters will review background information in the context of the current political environment, followed by two case studies, based on original qualitative interviews with trans* military service members. The presenters then lead attendees in a workshop-style, small-group activity in which they will apply the information presented to the presented cases.


3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
ID #123, Room: Bulfinch
A Second“Coming Out of the Closet”: Partner Abuse in the LGBTQ Community
Educational Session
Jacquelyn S. Jamason
Domestic violence is a significant public health issue. Internalized and externalized stressors associated with being a sexual minority interact with domestic violence to create or exacerbate vulnerabilities, higher risk for complex trauma experiences, and difficulties accessing services. Studies indicate the prevalence of domestic violence to be equal between the LGBT community and the heterosexual community. Results from the National Violence Against Women survey indicate that gay males are more at risk than a gay females. Approximately 23% of gay males studied reported to having been raped, physically assaulted, and/or stalked by another gay male. Slightly more than 11% of lesbians also reported the same circumstances. With a victimization rate of approximately 10 to 25 percent, the statistics for either being abused or knowing someone who has been abused is alarming, requiring a second“coming out of the closet.”


3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
ID #124, Room: Renwick
A Developmental Model for Improving Student Competencies With Clients who Identify as LGBTQQIA
Educational Session
Anita A. Neuer Colburn, Amy W. Upton
Counselor educators and supervisors are charged with training students to be culturally competent in all aspects of client diversity. Gender identity and sexual orientation have proven to be especially challenging diversity topics. The broad spectrum of personally held beliefs among both students and faculty/supervisors, along with the political environment, makes teaching competencies for working with LGBTQQIA people especially complex. In addition to values, educators and supervisors must be sensitive to students’ levels of development as they move from the classroom to the field. The presenters will explore a developmental model based on the literature and our clinical experiences of how counselor educators/supervisors can help students improve their competencies when working with gender and sexual diversity.


3:40 pm – 4:30 pm
ID #125, Room: Arlington
The Interaction Between Visual Gender Nonconformity, Transitional Status, and Homelessness
Educational Session
Lori Pranger
There is a higher risk of becoming either temporarily homeless or experiencing chronic homelessness for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals. While homeless, trans* individuals face increased risks of sexual and physical assault, survival prostitution, and suicide. This session explores the increased risk factors and the social justice actions that counselors can take to facilitate ethical care for their trans* clients.


4:40 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #126, Room: Burnham
Transgender: Moving From Awareness to Advocacy
Educational Session
Becca Smith
The session uses PowerPoint technology to overview and summarize the transgender population. The definition of transgender, which will include gender identity and genderqueer, will be explained. This session will also discuss how to best serve the transgender community in a counseling capacity. This will include supporting them psychologically, helping with campus resources, and navigating referrals for medical issues, including hormone therapy and possible gender affirming surgery. Attendees will be provided examples of how to write a support letter for hormone therapy and gender affirming surgery using the Standards of Care from WPATH. The session will explain the challenges this population faces, especially with the political issues in the media. Attendees will acquire an overall increased competency to work with the transgender population in a counseling setting.


4:40 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #127, Room: Latrobe
Illuminating Counselor Competency When Working With Lesbian Couples Forming Families
Educational Session
Jessica Danielson
Recent research suggests there is an increase in lesbian couples engaging in family formation (Hayman, Wilkes, Halcomb, & Jackson, 2015); family formation includes conception, pregnancy, and birth. Due to this increase, there has been increased visibility of lesbian women receiving maternity health care services. There is ample research on lesbian parents; however, scarce research exists regarding lesbian family formation and implications for mental health providers working with lesbian-headed families. As lesbian couples continue to seek maternity health care services, there will be an increasing need for lesbian-affirmative mental health services to aide in navigating concerns and challenges specific to lesbian- headed families. This session will illuminate counselor competency specific to lesbian-headed family formation. There will be a review of current literature, discussion of unique barriers to lesbian-headed family formation, and exploration of implications on practice.


4:40 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #128, Room: Bulfinch
“But my Religion Says I Cannot”: Counselor Trainee Competence and Preparedness to Work With Sexual Minority Clients
Educational Session
Kimberly Peeples, E. Joan Looby
Ethical codes delineate that counselors must provide sensitive, competent therapeutic services to sexual minority clients. Additionally, religious beliefs have been used to justify counseling students’ inability to counsel sexual minorities. Counseling programs are tasked with training counselors in clinically competent, therapeutically effective work. Studies reveal training deficiencies with counseling students who work with sexual minority clients (Bidell, 2012; Day, 2008). Counseling students must respond to sexually minority clients concerns in clinically appropriate ways. This session examines counseling students’ competence and preparedness to work with sexual minority clients. It also examines the impact of religious beliefs on the students’ competence when working with this population. This study utilized the Sexual Orientation Counselor Competency Scale (Bidell, 2005) and the Religious Life Inventory (Batson & Schoenrade, 1993). Also included are definitions, ethical and psychological issues, and affirming strategies, interventions, and training opportunities for working with this population.


4:40 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #129, Room: Renwick
Health and Health Care Access Challenges Experienced by LGBT Older Adults: What Counselors Should Know
Educational Session
Marcela Kepic, Vivian Lee
Older adults face many adversities, especially those who have been marginalized due to their sexual orientation. Affected by discrimination, many LGBT older adults experience isolation and depression, among other health challenges. This session will provide information related to health and health care access challenges experienced in LGBT older adults. Moreover, end-of-life issues pertaining to LGBT will be discussed, and cultural competencies for working with LGBT older adults will be presented.


RECEPTION /NETWORKING

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Grand Foyer – Declaration Level 1B


  Friday | June 9  


Poster Sessions

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
ID #301, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 1
Gender Dysphoria and Eating Disorders
Poster Session
Ashley West, Perri Hooper
The presenters explore the DSM-V criteria for gender dysphoria, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge- eating disorder and how the separate disorders interact and influence the onset and differential diagnosis of one another. They also look at clinical approaches to working with clients with these disorders as well as those who may be at risk of developing these disorders including but not limited to LBGTQ populations.


4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
ID #302, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 3
The Effect of Narrative Group Therapy on the Reduction of PTSD in LGBTQ Teenagers
Poster Session
Kayla Lunde
This presenter created this study in part with a research course she enrolled in for the Fall 2016 semester. The presenter aims to discuss her work with LGBTQ youths and her ambition to turn that work into a career upong raduation. In this poster session, she discusses how PTSD is associated heavily with combat veterans but other populations around the country experience PTSD as well and are not being treated effectively.


4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
ID #303, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 5
Gay Men and Their Friends: Understanding how Friendships are Built
Poster Session
Rosa Hwang, Justin Tauscher
This poster session will present three mediators in gay men’s friendship building: a) negotiating sexual identity with dominant culture (heteronormativity); b) shared struggles with women under hegemonic masculinity; and c) fear of straight men (heterophobia). In the study being presented, six pairs of friends were selected from the undergraduate population at University of Florida, and at least one person from each pair identified as gay. They were interviewed using a semi- structured interview process and completed surveys for demographic information. The results show that gay men struggle to identify with traditional masculinity, and thus find comfort in women to moderate their sexual identity. Future implications of this study include positive discourse in mixed orientation group therapy, interventions to address both homophobia and heterophobia, and a more complete understanding of how generational shifts may affect future research.


4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
ID #304, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 7
Islam and the LGBTQ Community: Literature, Views, and What Counselors Need to Know When Working With Muslim-Identified LGBTQ People
Poster Session
Jahaan Abdullah
Sexual identity and religion are both fundamental components of human development for nearly all people. One area of sexual identity underrepresented in literature is LGBTQ Muslims. LGBTQ Muslims are nearly invisible within the LGBTQ community, and after the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando, Florida, they have been thrust into the spotlight. This poster session introduces mental health professionals to the subject of same-sex orientation in Islam, brings awareness of the dangers LGBTQ Muslims face, and provides introductory knowledge for counseling professionals working with LGBTQ Muslim clients. Also presented are views of homosexuality in Islam, an overview of the paucity in scholarship and research, and information counselors need to know before working with LGBTQ Muslims.


4:30 pm – 5:00 pm
ID #305, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 9
Minorities Within Minorities: Using Mindfulness- Based Approaches With Ethnic and Racial LGBT Minority Clients
Poster Session
Rebecca Long
Ethnic and racial LGBT minority clients struggling with substance abuse are often misunderstood by their family, peers, and helping professionals. This community of minorities-within-minorities often presents a unique challenge to the helping professional. Ethnic and racial LGBT minority clients suffer from addictions and other mental health issues at a higher percentage than their heterosexual counterparts. This poster session will offer educational information, facts, and resources for those who work with this community of clients. Topics addressed include this population’s higher rates of substance abuse, reasons why this population does not complete treatment programs, how mindfulness- based therapeutic practices could be utilized with this population, and ways helping professionals can practice self-care.


5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #306, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 2
Navigating the Toxicity of Internalized Oppression
Poster Session
Gideon Litherland, Jahaan Abdullah
For LGBTQ clients, socialization and development occur within a heteronormative context that often results in a constant experience of invalidation. Internalized heterosexism is increasingly important in a practitioner’s conceptualization and therapeutic work with queer individuals because recent research has observed a relationship between the level of internalized heterosexism, mental health outcomes, and risky behaviors. More recently, counselors can observe the effect of institutional validation when it is present and absent. The presenters will provide attendees with a conceptual knowledge of internalized“isms” and the resultant deleterious impact. They will also provide intervention strategies for practitioners working with clients potentially stymied by their own internalized heterosexism.


5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #307, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 4
Using Queer Theory in Counseling With Gender Nonconforming Clients
Poster Session
Christina McGrath Fair, Alisha Dickerson, Tyler Oberheim, Maggie Creegan
Queer theory can be difficult to explain but was developed to challenge the modern definition of hetero/ homosexual and to explore ideas of truth, language, and power and how these are used to reinforce social control (Goodrich, Luke, & Smith, 2016). Gender nonconforming clients often have poorer health outcomes and increased mental health issues, including suicide (U.S. Transgender Survey, 2016). With an increased number of individuals who are gender nonconforming seeking counseling, providers will need to increase their competence (Budge, Thai, Tebbe, & Howard, 2016). This presentation will discuss how providers can increase their understanding and ability to work with gender nonconforming clients through the understanding of queer theory.


5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #308, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 6
Analysis of Transgender Identity Development Models: Time for a Change
Poster Session
S. Tyler Oberheim, Christina McGrath Fair, Leandra Desinord
The Association for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues in Counseling (ALGBTIC) has created competencies for professional counselors working with members of the transgender community. Issues related to gender-identity development may arise within the counseling relationship, and preexisting models of transgender identity development may not adhere to the competencies shaped by ALGBTIC. This presentation will provide an overview of these preexisting models and compare them to the competencies outlined by ALGBTIC and current literature on working with transgender individuals. The presenters will also discuss the next steps in developing a new identity development model that takes into account ALGBTIC competencies, intersectional theory, and current literature on the transgender community.


5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #309, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 8
LGBTQ+ Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling and Advocacy: Applied Strategies for College Counselors
Poster Session
Adrienne Erby, Christian Chan
Despite the varying social and political climate towards gender and sexual minorities over the years, college counselors maintain a pivotal role in supporting and empowering LGBTQ+ students. College counselors are uniquely equipped to serve as advocates with student affairs staff, university administrators, and community partners to create inclusive campus environments for LGBTQ+ students. Using the American Counseling Association’s Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (Ratts, Singh, Nassar-McMillan, Butler, & McCullough, 2015) and Advocacy Competencies (ACA, 2003) as a framework, the presentation will include strategies and recommendations for empowerment and advocacy at client/student, community/school, and public arena levels. The presenters will discuss challenges and barriers often faced by LGBTQ+ students, provide case studies and examples from their experiences, review resources on assessing campus climate, and discuss strategies for student empowerment and advocacy.


5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
ID #310, Room: Wilson, Poster Area 10
Coming Out as a Southern, Christian Lesbian
Poster Session
Lauren Quesenberry
This poster session discusses intersectionalities of identity in real time; that is, it exposes the formation of gender, sexuality, and religion/culture within a very specific time and place. What does southern culture teach us? How does religion shape us? What does it mean to be a woman? When coming out as a lesbian in the South, one’s womanity is questioned, among other things. This poster session will also reference resources for individuals and professionals grappling with faith and homosexuality.


  Saturday | June 10  

8:00 am – 1:00 pm
Registration Opens

Registration Desk - Level 3B


7:30 am – 8:45 am
Continental Breakfast

Constitution - Level 3B


Education Sessions

9:00 am – 9:50 am
ID #201, Room: Burnham
Common Experiences, Diverse Identities: A Life Span Approach to Counseling in the LGBT Community from the LGBTQ Task Group Initiative
Educational Session
Larry Burlew, Jane Rheineck, Robtrice Brawner, Monica Osburn, Catherine Roland
This session will examine the adult life span through the developmental stages of young, mid, and older adulthood in the LGBT community. The presenters will suggest strategies on counseling and advising individuals with multiple identities, including information regarding the level of oppression experienced. Risk factors and appropriate interventions will be discussed over six domains: coming out, spirituality, career, relationships, health, and the impact of bias/discrimination in each stage.


9:00 am – 9:50 am
ID #202, Room: Latrobe
Changing Times, Changing Advocacy: Action- Oriented Practice Insights for Couples Counseling With the LGBTQ+ Community
Educational Session
Christian D. Chan, Justyn D. Smith, Kim Lee Hughes, Adrienne N. Erby
The political atmosphere, shifting perspectives on values, and alterations in policies and protections have uniquely redefined intimate relationships among the LGBTQ+ community (Bigner & Wetchler, 2012). While the flexibility of intimacy, partner, and marriage relationships has extensively opened, the shifting nature and complexity of LGBTQ+ intimate relationships with identity, celebration, and oppression have garnered attention to systemic issues governed by systemic policies and protections. To discuss the complexity inherent in the couples modality with LGBTQ+ couples, there is a need to translate applicable functions of empirical and conceptual literature to engage practices specific to couples counseling. Utilizing case studies, collaborative dialogue, and a substantial evidence base to relevantly explicate the relationship with LGBTQ+ communities and couples modalities, the presenters will emphasize applications of ethical responsibility, negotiate the challenges of assumptions, mislabeling, and biases, and activate a social justice lens systemically to contextualize couples relationships in systems of privilege and oppression.


9:00 am – 9:50 am
ID #203, Room: Bulfinch
The Interaction Between Visual Gender Nonconformity, Transitional Status, and Homelessness
Educational Session
Lori Pranger
There is a higher risk of becoming either temporarily homeless or experiencing chronic homelessness for transgender and gender nonconforming individuals. While homeless, trans* individuals face increased risks of sexual and physical assault, survival prostitution, and suicide. This session explores the increased risk factors and the social justice actions that counselors can take to facilitate ethical care for their trans* clients.


9:00 am – 9:50 am
ID #204, Room: Renwick
Utilizing Expressive Arts Therapy in Counseling With LGBTQ Adolescent Clients
Educational Session
Rebecca Long
LGBTQ clients experience higher risk for co-occurring disorders, substance use, suicidality, and harassment. Expressive arts therapies have shown efficacy in the treatment of co-occurring disorders and as a harm reduction strategy. These techniques could benefit clients developing increased self-care and self-soothing actions for positive, strengths-based changes. This session will provide an overview into research and exercises that could be implemented in sessions by clinicians.


9:00 am – 9:50 am
ID #205, Room: Arlington
A Queer Sense of Mothering: The Negotiated Terrain of Gay Dads
Educational Session
Michelle E. Wade, Sean Robinson
Gay men who openly seek parenthood are challenging conventional definitions of masculinity and femininity, as well as the dominant and conventional gender and social norms found within heterosexual parents and families and within the gay community itself. This session will discuss the findings of a phenomenological inquiry into the experience of these gay dads and explore the unique challenges they face. The presenters will also discuss the counseling implications of these findings.


10:00 am – 10:50 am
ID #206, Room: Burnham
Taking the Lead for LGBTQ Youth: The Critical Role of Counselors in Creating a Climate for Safety, Inclusion, and Success
Educational Session
Vincent “Vinnie” Pompei
In recent months, the topic of LGBTQ youth, particularly transgender students, has dominated news stories and kitchen table conversations in all corners of the country. Decades of research confirm that LGBTQ youth face extremely high rates of bullying, harassment, and emotional distress in schools and beyond. This session will provide a snapshot of the most compelling data on LGBTQ student experiences, spotlight proven and emerging best practices for ensuring legal and practical protections for LGBTQ youth in schools, and build core skills for transforming the culture and climate to benefit all students. Additionally, this session will cover how school counselors can support transgender students, including guidance on bathrooms, name and pronouns changes, and general safety and inclusion. Get ready to improve comfort level, increase confidence, and become empowered to act for positive change.


10:00 am – 10:50 am
ID #207, Room: Latrobe
AIDS is Still Here: Counseling Gay Men on HIV, STIs, and Dating
Educational Session
Leslie Kooyman
Current HIV and STI infection rates among gay men, particularly younger gay men of color, continue to rise. The perceptions of sexual risk and behavioral choices are informed by growing up in an era with powerful medical advances which mean that for many individuals, having HIV no longer equals death, and becoming infected with HIV or another STI is often not seen as a cause for real concern. The counseling and prevention methods early in the epidemic were effective, but now counselors are facing a new generation of gay men who have a different context for understanding HIV/AIDS and STIs. The intersectionality of multiple identities (race, ethnicity, class, disability, sexual orientation) increase the need for more advanced counseling strategies with these at-risk populations. This interactive session will examine the counseling implications and strategies for working with gay men on issues of sexual risk taking, HIV and STIs, relationships, and dating. Counseling implications for exploring areas such as sexual behavior, risk reduction, PrEP, dating patterns, Internet hook-ups, intersectionality of identities, and HIV/STI basic facts will be explored through presentation and discussion. A diverse case study will be provided to illustrate the use of creative strategies and resources for counselors.


10:00 am – 10:50 am
ID #208, Room: Bulfinch
Acculturation, Discrimination, and Mental Health in LGBTQ Immigrant Populations
Educational Session
Kshipra Jain, Diona Emmanuel
The recent influx of immigrants to the United States has sparked major discourse in our political system. Migration is not an easy task, and immigrants often undergo the stressful process of acculturation. Moreover, being part of both a racial minority and a sexual minority has added implications for societal status and treatment. For instance, being part of the LGBTQ+ community along with South Asian ethnicity has added implications on the experience of discrimination and microaggressions. Research has shown that these negative experiences can have a negative impact on psychological well-being. This speaks to the need for multiculturally competent counseling for this population to provide them with the skills needed to improve stress management and daily functioning. This session will explore findings from recent literature, though sparse, that look at the impact of intersectionality—that is, being an immigrant who also identifies as LGBTQ+ in the United States. Clinical implications of working with LGBTQ+ immigrant populations will also be discussed.


10:00 am – 10:50 am
ID #209, Room: Renwick
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth: Family Acceptance and Emotional Development
Educational Session
Julie Basulto
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth experience a variety of struggles when coming out to their families of origin. These struggles include lack of acceptance and support by their families as well as isolation, depression, engagement in risk-taking behaviors such as drug and alcohol abuse, and the risk of suicide. This session will address prior research on family support and acceptance with LGBTQ youth in their sexual identity development, and the presenter will suggest possible solutions for counselors to provide assistance with the youth and their families during this adjustment process.


10:00 am – 10:50 am
ID #210, Room: Arlington
Serving the Needs of LGBTQ Clients: The State of Civil Rights Protections in Schools and the Workplace; Advocating for LGBTQ Students and Clients
Educational Session
Amy Zavadil
For several decades, civil rights-based protections for LGBTQ-identified individuals were increasingly solidified through case law, federal guidance, and legislation. Through the lens of Title IX, college student affairs, and other equity issues resources, the presenter will discuss how counselors can support their students and clients through awareness of legal and policy protections in school and workplace. Identifying the available legal rights and resources that can support client advocacy, whether in a school or agency setting, is vital to the focused empowerment by counselors that encourage client self-advocacy.


11:00 am – 11:50 am
ID #211, Room: Burnham
From the Concealed to the Accessible: Black, Female, Gay, and the Relentless Pursuit of Mental Wellness and Happiness
Educational Session
Camille M. Hazeur
The presenter will provide a 50-year narrative journey of her path to mental wellness, professional development, and happiness. In 1950s Alabama, being black, female, and gay could have been a life sentence of concealment and oppression. This session will be a reflection of how a chance encounter with a mental health counselor led to exploration and knowledge of oneself that overcame terror, confusion, and fear, and led to an immensely engaged life of human rights advocacy. The presentation and discussion will provide attendees with ideas and examples of how self-exploration, counseling, faith and a deep, abiding sense of respect for others can combat bias, prejudice, and oppression.


11:00 am – 11:50 am
ID #212, Room: Latrobe
Trauma-Informed Care for Transgender Clients
Educational Session
Lola Georg
The majority of transgender people have been exposed to trauma, including domestic violence and sexual assault. This session will explore trauma endured by people as part of a stigmatized group, as part of a family, in the workplace, and in behavioral health settings. The presenter will explore treatment approaches that are sensitized to the impact of trauma on long-term mental health and other approaches that create safe and supportive environments for transgender clients. The presenter will review psychological symptoms with a trauma-informed lens and incorporate aspects of trauma in treatment plans for transgender clients. Finally, the impact of vicarious trauma upon clinicians and trauma- informed approaches to self-care will be explored.


11:00 am – 11:50 am
ID #213, Room: Bulfinch
Justice Involvement: Another Risk Factor for the LGBT Community
Educational Session
Mary Page
The LBGT community is significantly overrepresented in the criminal justice system. Factors leading to justice involvement include family abandonment, school bullying, harassment, and exposure to physical and sexual violence. Upon entering the justice system, a risk needs assessment must be administered to identify behavioral health, medical, and criminogenic risk needs. Treatment services are better served in the community; collaborating with community stakeholders to meet those needs is an essential part of successful transition from jail to community. Identifying vulnerable populations in the criminal justice system, such as the mentally ill, homeless, substance use/misuse, and LGBT populations, and matching them with comprehensive and effective community-based services is an essential component in the success of those individuals. Solutions for efficacious transition needs include enrollment in Medicaid and/or SSI/SSDI benefits, coordinating with community agencies for appropriate placement, and/or early release to substance use/misuse treatment.


11:00 am – 11:50 am
ID #214, Room: Renwick
Whose Journey is it Anyways?
Educational Session
Breanna Crowley, Ami Crowley
This presentation will address the process of coming out as transgender. Discussion will be generated around the pressure transgender individuals feel to come out to friends, family, employers, partners, and others, as well as fully or partially transition. Special considerations will be made for identifying ways counselors may unintentionally contribute to the pressure.


11:00 am – 11:50 am
ID #215, Room: Arlington
Ethical and Legal Considerations: Complicated Issues in Challenging Times
Educational Session
Stephanie Dailey
Over the past decade, conscience objections have surfaced in the public arena, raising questions as to whether counselors may legally refuse services to LGBTQ+ clients due to a counselor’s personally held beliefs. These laws not only deny services to LGBTQ+ clients but also are in direct violation of the ACA Code of Ethics (2014). In addition to values-based referrals, this session will address other challenging and complex ethical and legal issues all counselors, particularly those working with LGBTQ+ adults, need to know.


Lunch

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Constitution – Level 3B


1:15 pm – 2:05 pm
ID #216, Room: Burnham
Identity Development of South Asian Same-Sex Attracted Women: Implications for Counseling
Educational Session
Surinder Bal
Asians are the fastest growing minority population in the United States; their population is projected to double to eight percent by 2050 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2010). South Asians comprise approximately a third of this population. Thus, the South Asian LGBTQ population will also become a significant minority in the larger LGBTQ population. South Asian cultural values and beliefs significantly influence sexual identity development for both first- and second-generation same-sex attracted women, leading to unique experiences of discrimination and marginalization. Counselors working with this population must sensitively incorporate these cultural factors for effective treatment planning and to avoid further harm by unintentionally reinforcing existing experiences of injustice and oppression.


1:15 pm – 2:05 pm
ID #217, Room: Latrobe
Affirmative Counseling With LGBTQI+ People
Educational Session
Misty Ginicola, Joel M. Filmore
Possessing cultural competence with LGBTQI+ people is crucial in providing quality counseling services to clients who are gender and affectional minorities. Based on their recently released ACA book, the presenters will provide the broad base for awareness, knowledge, and skills that counselors must possess when working with LGBTQI+ clients. The session will focus on evaluating one’s own attitudes and beliefs surrounding gender and affectional orientation, gaining knowledge regarding history and current marginalization, and understanding developmental, intersectional, and identity issues. The presenters will distinguish between important and problematic terminology, and provide a beginning understanding of each specialized population’s needs. The elements of affirmative counseling will also be discussed.


1:15 pm – 2:05 pm
ID #218, Room: Bulfinch
Career Counseling and Community Collaboration During the Best and Worst of Times: The Experiences of a Career Counselor Before and After Pulse
Educational Session
Chad Brown
This presentation will focus on experiences working within systems such as higher education and juvenile justice, specifically with millennials and other young people. The presenter lives fewer than 15 miles from the Pulse nightclub, and he will share his experiences and those of fellow local counselors and the greater community. This presentation will emphasize the importance of community collaboration within areas of counseling, including crisis and career counseling. The presenter will also share how the use of brief solutions- focused career counseling can be effective and efficient for clients of many identities, allowing for an affordable and accessible option to help members of at-risk communities. This presentation will demonstrate the importance of community collaboration among private practice career counselors, educational institutions, and other community resources based on the mental, physical, and spiritual needs of each individual.


1:15 pm – 2:05 pm
ID #219, Room: Renwick
Religion and the Rainbow: A Counselor Trainee’s Journey to Help Clients Reconcile Conflicting Identities
Educational Session
Joel M. Clark, Laura S. Wheat
Clients who identify as members of the LGBTQ+ community often face the struggle of seeming incongruence among their gender, sexual orientation, and religious/spiritual identities. Counselors frequently possess little knowledge or training to assist clients in this dilemma and may encounter their own biases as well. This presentation will share a Master’s student’s personal and professional journey to becoming a more competent counselor relative to this intersection of identities. The presenters will describe how clinical supervision, guided independent study of empirical research and theoretical literature, and introspection worked together to increase this counselor trainee’s understanding and ability to help his clients navigate their conflicts and achieve greater integration of their multiple selves. Additionally, the presenters will discuss applicable theoretical models (Rosik & Popper, 2014), empirically based interventions and techniques, and concrete implications for counselors.


1:15 pm – 2:05 pm
ID #220, Room: Arlington
Trans Men: Exploring Sexual and Gender Identity Issues
Educational Session
William Baker
Separating the “T” from LGBTQ, this presentation will focus on the case histories of trans men, their journeys through transition, and how their sexual and gender identities may have changed throughout that process. Results of a qualitative research study will be presented using interviews from the participants, concluding with an interactive discussion on the fluidity of sexual orientation, gender identity, and how these trans men view male privilege. Attendees will be encouraged to move away from the traditional “binary” or dichotomous divisions of male/female, gay/ straight, and heteronormative views of the world and other people. Counselors need to be aware that many people, especially in the transgender community, view themselves as neither male nor female, gay nor straight, but rather as genderqueer. These trans persons see themselves as somewhere on the spectrum of gender identity.


Closing Keynote


2:15 pm – 3:30 pm
Closing Session and Keynote

Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, PhD
Room: Constitution A

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