About ACA

About ACA

The American Counseling Association is a not-for-profit, professional and educational organization that is dedicated to the growth and enhancement of the counseling profession. Founded in 1952, ACA is the world's largest association exclusively representing professional counselors in various practice settings.

 

8 Ways ACA Helped Counselors Help Others in 2018

2018 ACA Annual Report Infographic

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What Is Counseling?

According to 20/20: A Vision for the Future of Counseling, the delegates comprised of 31 counseling organizations agreed upon a unified definition of counseling: Professional counseling is a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

Divisions, Branches, and Regions

There are 18 chartered divisions within the American Counseling Association. These divisions provide leadership, resources and information unique to specialized areas and/or principles of counseling.  ACA has four regions, which serves members in those regions.  Lastly, ACA has 56 chartered branches in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America.  Please click the following links to get more information about ACA's Divisions, Branches, and Regions.

Policies, Bylaws & Forms


ACA Articles of Incorporation and Amendments
ACA Articles of Incorporation - August 1952 

ACA Bylaws
Bylaws - March 2015

ACA Policies Manual
Policy Manual - May 2019

ACA Code of Ethics

2014 ACA Code of Ethics

ACA Nominations and Elections Handbook - February 2020
2020-2021 ACA Nominations and Election Handbook Feb 2020


Code of Leadership Conduct

ACA Code of Leadership Conduct

Past Meeting Minutes
APGA/AACD/ACA Governance Meeting Minutes

Governing Council Motions
Governing Council Motions - 2003-Present (June 2020)

IRS Form 1023, Exemption Application

IRS Tax Exemption Letter for ACA

IRS Tax Exemption Letter for ACA Group (ACA divisions that are listed)

IRS Form 990 - ACA 2017 Public Version




Learn more about what ACA does for its members here.

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  • Latest News

    Celebrate Juneteenth

    by LaTina Lewis | Jun 18, 2020
    Every year, Juneteenth takes place on June 19 and is also known as Freedom Day, Jubilee Day, Black Independence Day, and Cel-Liberation Day. This holiday commemorates the day in 1865 when Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas to announce the end of the Civil War and slavery.

    Did you know:

    • Texas was the last in the Confederacy to receive word that the Civil War was over and that slavery had been abolished.

    • The Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln, had legally freed slaves in Texas on January 1, 1863, almost 2½ years earlier. Even after the general order, some slave masters withheld the information from their slaves, holding them as slaves through one more harvest season.

    • Despite the announcement, Texas slave owners weren't too eager to part with what they felt was their property. When freed people tried to leave, many of them were beaten, lynched, or murdered.

    • Texans celebrated Juneteenth beginning in 1866, with community-centric events, such as parades, cookouts, prayer gatherings, historical and cultural readings, and musical performances. Over time, communities have developed their own traditions.

    • On January 1, 1980, Juneteenth officially became a Texas state holiday. Al Edwards, a freshman state representative, put forward the bill, H.B. 1016, making Texas the first state to grant this emancipation celebration.

    • Although Juneteenth is not a federal holiday 45 other states and the District of Columbia have also commemorated or recognized the day.

    ACA will celebrate and commemorate Juneteenth and encourages others to consider implementing this day as a “day of learning” in their workplace, where employees can participate in educating themselves about the history and experience of Black Americans.

     

    Additional Resources:

    www.juneteenth.com

    https://www.history.com/news/what-is-juneteenth

    12 Things You Might Not Know About Juneteenth

    Library of Congress Blog “Celebrating Juneteenth”

    Voices from the days of slavery