ACA Blog

  • Haylee Wilson

    Group Counseling

    • Haylee Wilson
    Sep 10, 2012
    One of my greatest frustrations is group work. As a college student, high school student, and even an elementary school student I remember lamenting with my friends about group work, to which we were very averse. “Someone always does all the work and the rest of the group members get the credit.” “I can’t stand my group. None of us get a long.” “Group work is ridiculous. We will never work in groups in real life. We will only work by ourselves.” Such were some of the comments said by either myself or others. Today, it amazes me how wrong we were and that all along our teachers were right.
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  • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully

    Remembering 9-11

    • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully
    Sep 10, 2012
    In recent days I have found myself reflecting on the upcoming 11th Anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks and the difference a year makes. On this date last year – September 10, 2011 – I was in Manhattan volunteering at a survivor’s information forum sponsored by the VOICES of September 11th, an association founded by a mom after her son was among those killed at the World Trade Center. I had met this mom, Mary Fetchet just weeks before when she delivered a keynote address at “Counselors Remembering 9-11: A Shared Journey”, a workshop I helped to organize through the Connecticut Counseling Association. Mary has a powerful presence and during her presentation, everyone in the audience was mesmerized by her and by the resilience she displayed in choosing to form the VOICES of September 11th, making it her life’s work.
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  • Ray McKinnis

    ‘Evidence-Based’ Again

    • Ray McKinnis
    Sep 10, 2012
    The September 2012 issue of Counseling Today has a comprehensive article called ‘Should counseling practice be evidence based?’ The answer of course is Yes. I have never met a counselor who does not want to be effective and to be effective each of us uses the best evidence we can get given who we are and who our client is. However, those who use this phrase usually mean something more narrowly defined—should results from randomized clinical trials (RCT) be the gold standard for discerning information about what works and what does not in a counseling situation.
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  • Jill Presnell

    The Inpatient Therapist: The mental health profession’s red-headed step child?

    • Jill Presnell
    Sep 06, 2012
    Several settings come to mind when one thinks of a counselor. A small, comfortably adorned private office. An even smaller, less comfortably adorned office at a school or community clinic. A somewhat chaotic family home. Or perhaps the more subdued residence of the elderly or infirmed. One of the last settings that comes to mind is that of a psychiatric inpatient unit. I mean, don’t psychiatrist and psychologists do that?
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  • Brooke Collison

    A Counselor Educator in Kenya—Blog 6: It’s the Same Everywhere

    • Brooke Collison
    Sep 06, 2012
    Yesterday, I attended two faculty meetings at KeMU—a college faculty meeting and a counseling department meeting. Surprise! The topics sounded exactly the same as the ones I’ve been hearing for 30+ years: requirements for continuing contracts, faculty load, effect of increased tuition on decline in student enrollment, cost of credit hour production, and need to have a good dialogue with university administration on some issues. In the department meeting, discussion focused on grade distributions across the several campus programs of KeMU (in Nairobi, Mombasa, Nakuru, Maua, and Nyeri).
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  • Nicole Michaud

    The truth about pressure

    • Nicole Michaud
    Sep 05, 2012
    Lately I have been feeling a bit lost in what I am doing with myself. It would seem that this should be the most care free time I have had in years with my schooling finally being finished and my babies in daycare while I search for a job. However, I ironically feel a greater sense of unrest than I did before. I know it is partly due to the fact that I feel ill at ease not having a clear professional “purpose”.
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  • Anthony Centore

    Is Your Counseling Practice Built to Sell? (Part 2 of 2) 11 Ways to Increase the Value of Your Counseling Practice

    • Anthony Centore
    Sep 04, 2012
    In the previous column, we discussed the importance of building a sellable private practice, and we looked at formulas for valuing a service business. In this column, we’ll review 11 ways that you can make your business worth top dollar to an acquirer.
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  • Andrea Holyfield

    Showing your Roots

    • Andrea Holyfield
    Sep 04, 2012
    I’ve learned to purposely avoid certain conversations so as to not be seen as an angry black woman. I try to explain to people that I’m passionate about things and sometimes my passion and the expression of that emotion may seem like anger if you’re not accustom to a really good heated discussion. I get it. So there are conversations that I won’t get into on Facebook for example. I skip past any status about being a good wife (I don’t believe I’m quite qualified to lead that discussion). I avoid MOST parenting discussions and I have NEVER engaged in a political debate via social media. My blogs…up to this point have been primarily safe. I think, so far, I've avoided angry black woman….until now. Now…I’m angry and I’m black and I’m a woman so…try as I might to avoid this discussion, I’m going to go ahead and jump into it because well…it’s my turn to submit a blog.
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  • Haylee Wilson

    A "testing" Semester

    • Haylee Wilson
    Sep 04, 2012
    It is safe to assume that many of us have been subjected to the litany of standardized testing that haunts our academic careers. For students in Florida, it begins early, often in elementary and middle school in the form of the FCAT or Iowa tests. In high school, we dedicate numerous hours in school and countless sleepless nights to the SAT and the ACT, fearing that out entire future resides on the four digit score.
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  • Doc Warren

    HALT! Remembering your PPT’s can help not only in recovery counseling but also general therapy.

    • Doc Warren
    Sep 04, 2012
    Those of you who specialize or have had training in substance abuse likely know what the above capitalized letters reference, those without such training may not and it is a shame as they have so much to offer not only our clients who are battling with addiction but most everyone we treat not to mention ourselves. HALT stands for never letting yourself get too: Hungry, Angry, Lonely or Tired. PPT’s remind us that we need to examine and monitor the People, Places and Things that we get or are involved with. Are they helpful or harmful to us?
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