ACA Blog

  • Kareem Puranda

    Cops, Robbers, and Counselors Ohhh My…

    • Kareem Puranda
    Oct 01, 2012
    Can counselors find a niche in between these polarities? The common thread between these entities is the affirming of community trust. From a historical standpoint I think criminals and police officers share similar ideologies relative to their context…. both believe the other is the adversary, at times both consider each other a gang, both are willing to use deadly force, both are constantly thinking of ways to perform their jobs better and the list continues. If you can come up with anymore commonalities please feel free to cue them in the comments.
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  • Barbara Jordan

    New Clinical Supervisors: Check Out This Checklist!

    • Barbara Jordan
    Oct 01, 2012
    So you’ve been promoted to Clinical Supervisor. You received some training and passed the certification test. You've been a counselor/therapist for years. However, you've never held a Clinical Supervision meeting. So now what? How do you conduct these meetings? How often should you meet with your counselors for supervision?
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  • Susan Jennifer Polese

    The Agony and the Ecstasy of Countertransference

    • Susan Jennifer Polese
    Oct 01, 2012
    The old boy has been disavowed throughout the ages. But we all owe him and extra thank you – not only for providing the rich fodder for truly wonderful Woody Allen films, but for giving us the juicy concepts of regression, sublimation, denial – and my favorite (for the purposes of this blog post): countertransference. Yes, I am talking about Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, who even the most devoted of psychoanalytic therapists say was, well – just plain wrong in the majority of his assumptions and his approach to mental health.
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  • Stacee Reicherzer

    Workplace Bullying

    • Stacee Reicherzer
    Oct 01, 2012
    One phenomenon I’ve observed is that the workplace creates precisely the right type of circumstances for individuals to get all of their old feelings of self-doubt and inadequacy triggered. Some individuals in these circumstances lash out and become aggressive as a tactic for trying to restore their worth. Whereas workplace violence is a significant problem, physical attacks are much less frequent than relational aggression: gossiping, intimidation, demeaning. When we consider how commonplace these behaviors are in organizations, and how they impact both the victim and the organization as a whole, we can begin to understand the nature of this problem, and how they really are the adult link to playground bullying behaviors among children.
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  • Nancy White

    When the Day Goes Wrong

    • Nancy White
    Oct 01, 2012
    It seems like when the “day goes wrong” in the criminal justice system, it really goes wrong. I have been spending a great deal of time thinking about just how to write this blog. Then I realized I had been thinking about it for a month, and it is just time to write.
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  • Haylee Wilson

    What do you do when you plateau?

    • Haylee Wilson
    Oct 01, 2012
    Admittedly, this time of year always seems the hardest to me. With the approach of fall, although in south Florida fall isn’t really a reprieve from the brutal summer heat, it seems time begins to race toward the end of the calendar year. Halloween arrives, followed quickly by Thanksgiving, and then suddenly New Year’s is upon us. This time of year is also distinct in terms of the academic course load. Midterms seem to appear out of thin air while research papers and final exams loom in the horizon. Even the addition of daylight savings time does little to stop the feeling that when dark approaches as six o’clock there simply are not enough hours in the day.
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  • Anderson Antoine

    Personality and Counseling

    • Anderson Antoine
    Oct 01, 2012
    As you sit in your counseling sessions working at helping clients resolve their varied concerns or problems, could it be rather challenging or even impossible to reach some of them, based on differences of personalities between you and your client?
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  • Lee Kehoe

    A Counselor and A Pharmacologist?

    • Lee Kehoe
    Oct 01, 2012
    This week’s entry involves my thoughts and aspect of working with older adult clients that I have found to be incredibly important to gaining a comprehensive picture and providing the best possible treatment for each individual. As I’ve gained more experience working with older adults, I’ve also gained a wealth of knowledge into the world of pharmacology. As a counselor it is imperative to have some background into the numerous psychotropics that are used so widely in today’s world; however, as a counselor working with older adults, I have also become familiar with medications that target just about every human function. It is important to note that my growing familiarity still leaves me far from an expert in pharmacology, rather my familiarity has driven my curiosity and in addition led to some concerning questions regarding the use of certain medications in older adults. I do believe the prescription of various medications to older adults is out of a desire to best maintain or improve their health and well being; however, in hearing stories from the families of some of my older adult clients and reading literature on such medications, I find myself feeling as though the relationship between the use of pharmaceuticals and older adults needs some large modifications and improvements.
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  • Sandi Logan

    What’s in a Name?

    • Sandi Logan
    Oct 01, 2012
    Often times, I hear adults make statements such as “Oh, yea, I remember my guidance counselor” or “I never saw my guidance counselor; I didn’t need to.” And maybe this is just a pet peeve of mine, but I get irritated by this. Perhaps in the past the term ‘guidance counselor’ was appropriate. Students and even the general public held the belief that a guidance counselor was simply present to provide guidance and advice. A high school guidance counselor simply sat in their office and met with students who needed help deciding on classes to take. Or perhaps, a student in distress would see the guidance counselor to ask for advice about what to do. On the whole, the guidance counselor was available, if you sought out such a resource. In the early to mid-1900’s, a list of duties was identified for counselors. The 1950’s to 1970’s school counseling began to form a foundation for development of a program. Counselors were seen as a part of a system: the school system. By the 1980’s to 1990’s, developing, organizing, and managing a school counseling program began to cultivate.
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  • Kristen Eckhardt

    The Power of Saying Hello

    • Kristen Eckhardt
    Sep 27, 2012
    I walked into the first day of my internship back in August and thought, “How am I going to relate to the residents?” How was I going to build that all-important relationship? The residents in the living room that day looked at me kind of skeptically, and I don’t blame them. Most of the residents come from very different backgrounds and have lived very different lives than me. They are White American, African American, Southern, facing serious mental disorders, legal issues, estrangement from families, and rebuilding their lives from the ground up. They aren’t over-eager White East Coast counseling students by way of Nebraska that moved to Louisiana six weeks ago. I wasn’t even sure I’d be able to relate to the staff.
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