ACA Blog

  • Kristen Eckhardt

    The Power of Saying Hello

    • Kristen Eckhardt
    Sep 27, 2012
    I walked into the first day of my internship back in August and thought, “How am I going to relate to the residents?” How was I going to build that all-important relationship? The residents in the living room that day looked at me kind of skeptically, and I don’t blame them. Most of the residents come from very different backgrounds and have lived very different lives than me. They are White American, African American, Southern, facing serious mental disorders, legal issues, estrangement from families, and rebuilding their lives from the ground up. They aren’t over-eager White East Coast counseling students by way of Nebraska that moved to Louisiana six weeks ago. I wasn’t even sure I’d be able to relate to the staff.
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  • Brooke Collison

    A Counselor Educator in Kenya—Blog #9: The Wisdom of Youth

    • Brooke Collison
    Sep 26, 2012
    While I have been teaching on the KeMU campus, my spouse, Joan, has been volunteering several nights a week at a children’s home not far away. A university driver picks her up about 5:00 and she returns to the Guest House on campus where we are staying about 9:00 PM. Each night when she returns, she is full of stories about “the kids.” It takes her a while to talk about what has happened, what she has experienced, and what she might do next to be helpful.
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  • Nicole Michaud

    I want to be a therapist when I grow up

    • Nicole Michaud
    Sep 25, 2012
    I can still remember the moment when I knew that being a therapist was the work I was meant to do. I was actually all of about 12 years old. I was standing in a group chatting at sleep away camp when another camper came over to us. She told us about a friend of ours who was homesick and crying in their tent. One of the girls offered to go and talk to her but was stopped by another girl. She told her “No, let Nicole go. She knows what to do.”
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  • Doc Warren

    I remember Danny: portrait of a pedophile. Part one of Two

    • Doc Warren
    Sep 25, 2012
    I spent the first part of my childhood in the projects. I mean, as projects go it was pretty nice. There were no large apartment complexes; this was Bristol Connecticut after all so we had duplexes and I even had a little “fort” outback that in reality was a Mountain Laurel with a rock that was kind of chair shaped, or so it felt to a 2 or 3 year old. There also was an oak tree growing through the middle, it was right in front of my “chair” so I pretended it was a TV set and imagined all the cartoons that it played. I had some great times in my little fort. At one time I must have had at least 3 or 4 friends “watching cartoons” in there with me.
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  • Pam Ebert

    Under-educated White People Are Dying Early

    • Pam Ebert
    Sep 25, 2012
    I recently became aware of a new study, published last month in Health Affairs and reported on September 20 in the New York Times that discussed the decrease in life-spans for the least-educated whites in the United States. The journal article, which was written by Olshansky et al. (2012), posits that the disparity in life expectancy is becoming larger in respect to race and educational attainment. This all means that poor and/or uneducated white people are catching up with other minorities in terms of early death.
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  • Jill Presnell

    The Inpatient Therapist: The “Drug Seekers” (Reactive disengagement Part 2)

    • Jill Presnell
    Sep 24, 2012
    I work on an Acute Inpatient Mental Health unit. We provide mental health treatment, not drug and alcohol treatment yet we keep getting folks who are addicted to illegal or prescription drugs. Individuals who are violent and psychotic from using bath salts get dragged to the ER by police and then are dumped on us. Addicts trying to escape going to jail come to the unit claiming that they are depressed and suicidal. People with “chronic pain" whose doctors won’t give them anymore pain meds or who have used up their script early suddenly claim that they feel hopeless or depressed and “can’t take it anymore.” They know that when they’re admitted they will be given more pain meds. Once these people get on the floor, they spend the whole time arguing and drug seeking. If they come to groups, they blame everyone else for their problems and don’t take responsibility for anything. They act like teenagers.
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  • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully

    A Journey of Hope & Healing

    • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully
    Sep 24, 2012
    I have spent my entire career counseling people struggling with medical issues including cancer, cardiac disease, neurological disorders and chronic pain. Thus, I am very familiar with the challenges of life-threatening and chronic illness on the mind, the body and the spirit. I was quite inspired this week by Good Morning America's Robin Roberts, whom on the eve of undergoing a Bone Marrow Transplant uttered these words:
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  • Haylee Wilson

    Transference and countertransference

    • Haylee Wilson
    Sep 24, 2012
    Transference and countertransference. As an undergraduate in psychology I had no idea what either of these words meant. Now, these words, and many others, are a part of my everyday vocabulary. Our professors remind us in each class each semester to be mindful of transference and countertransference, to realize its benefits and mostly its disadvantages. Addressing our personal issues before we begin practicing is often encouraged in order to avoid a potentially negative situation involving transference. One professor even went as far as to share with the class his own experiences with counseling after the death of his wife. Having only known this man for maybe one or two weeks, I thought he was very brave to share his story with us. While we are all counselors-in-training, it is still unnerving to share your history with a group of strangers.
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  • Anderson Antoine

    Personal Identity Issues

    • Anderson Antoine
    Sep 24, 2012
    I have been counseling persons who seem to be experiencing identity crises. This situation forced me to raise questions pertaining to Erik Erikson’s and other philosophies of identity, and psychological developmental issues. One may ask oneself questions relating to the many adults, who, through certain experiences or exposures were capable of rediscovering themselves and establishing a different understanding of themselves as well as who they want to be. It seems that I have a powerful leaning towards the level of stimulation for development provided by the environment in which one develops. Let us not forget that ‘all behaviours are learnt’.
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  • Kristen Eckhardt

    Planting Good Seeds

    • Kristen Eckhardt
    Sep 24, 2012
    I realize last week’s post sounded pretty down, and in truth, that’s absolutely how I felt. Sometimes, life feels like one step forward and one step back. If you read my post anyway, thank you--maybe you’ve been there before or are going through something similar. But there’s a much, much happier ending to this week!
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