ACA Blog

  • John Sommers-Flanagan

    Secrets of the Miracle Question in Counseling: Part I

    • John Sommers-Flanagan
    Dec 04, 2012
    You might want to sit down because this could take a while. Developed in the 1970s by Insoo Kim Berg and Steven de Shazer, the miracle question has become a very popular therapy intervention. It’s standard fare for solution-focused therapists and has been written about extensively. In 2004, Linda Metcalf wrote a whole book about it and in 2010 Ryan Howes of Psychology Today declared it the #10 most “cool” intervention in psychotherapy.
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  • Natosha Monroe

    The Power of Interpersonal Connections: Someone Believing in You

    • Natosha Monroe
    Dec 03, 2012
    YouTube is not typically my thing, but I’m glad my mom put her cell phone in front of my face Monday to share this video with me. It’s AMAZING. I shared it with my psychology students because our topic was the psychology of healing and it fit perfectly. The ex-paratrooper featured in the video had all but given up: He was overweight, unhappy…but someone believed in him and offered him hope. If you haven’t seen it, stop reading this right now and go watch it…then come back and finish reading of course! Here’s how to view it:
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  • Anthony Centore

    Getting on Insurance Panels: 2013 Opportunities and Challenges

    • Anthony Centore
    Dec 03, 2012
    As we approach the New Year, our credentialing team is being asked more and more frequently what 2013 will bring for the process of getting on insurance panels. That’s a good question! While we don’t have a crystal ball, the trends show us a lot. Here are our predictions for 2013.
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  • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully

    The Four Agreements: Toltec Wisdom

    • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully
    Dec 03, 2012
    The month of November can be a bittersweet time for me. It conjures painful memories of grief and loss; this year was particularly melancholy. Being a northeast resident, we faced back-to-back weather challenges with Hurricane Sandy and then a Nor’easter which dumped nearly ten inches of snow. My office was closed for an entire week due to power outages which oddly didn’t feel like a break from work. Rather, it felt like I was persistently on call waiting to be ordered back to the office. This was my entrance into November this year and I’ve felt off center since.
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  • Sandi Logan

    Are You My Mother…Oops I Mean Supervisor?

    • Sandi Logan
    Dec 03, 2012
    Who is responsible for providing supervision for professional school counselors? Is it the responsibility of their site administrator? Or perhaps, a district level individual whose job entails overseeing various educational support professionals?
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  • Lisa Krystosek

    Horses as Counselors: Hippotherapy

    • Lisa Krystosek
    Nov 28, 2012
    This week we will explore the world of Hippotherapy. Despite the way it sounds, we are not using the hippopotamus for therapeutic purposes - although I would like to see that!
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  • Doc Warren

    Clinicians are not competitors: Pillwillop Therapeutic Farm receives open arms and guidance from Spring Lake Ranch.

    • Doc Warren
    Nov 28, 2012
    A few years ago I was at a conference and saw a display table for a program called “Spring Lake Ranch” and met Rachel Stark who was manning the booth and also was in charge of Admissions and Outreach. I found her to be a bit different, unlike others who were simply trying to sell a program. Rachel appeared to not be trying to sell a program so much as she was trying to promote an idea. This intrigued me mainly because it is how I feel about the programs that I developed and direct. Hers is not mainstream to say the least, which really is a shame when you think about it. Nestled on 600 acres of land in Vermont they have developed a true therapeutic community. The program blends ranch work with a therapeutic milieu; a combination of lay people and licensed pros make up the program staff. Clients take part in everything from growing food and animals, to woodwork, syrup making, maintenance etc. they learn how to adapt to life in more productive ways, how to address their issues, increase personal responsibility and self respect and also how to be both interdependent and as independent as possible; a combination that is hard to find.
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  • Brooke Collison

    Final Exams and End-of-Year Stuff!!

    • Brooke Collison
    Nov 28, 2012
    It’s final exam time at KEMU. The exam system here is a little different than what I have known; and, you may have read my descriptions of the exam writing process if you are a regular blog follower (Hey, I hope you are—even though I don’t know who you are).
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  • Lee Kehoe

    Changing Roles and Identity in Later Life

    • Lee Kehoe
    Nov 27, 2012
    Through the major transitions, grieving of losses, onset of loneliness, and perceived loss of control, the relinquishment of roles typical of adulthood and acceptance of roles typical to later life become a great challenge for older adults. As I have worked with older adult clients, another theme that adds to the difficulties of adjusting to later life revolves around learning to navigate new roles. Many older adults worked for up to four decades in the same job, developing an identity that was very connected to that job. I have worked with female clients who identify as a mother before anything else; however, are still learning to adjust to having their grown children act as their caregiver, while they are left with no one to care for. These are just a couple examples of the role changes that I have seen in working with my older adult clients. Such role changes go deeper than simply getting use to a new way of living; they tap into the core identity of a person. When that identity is shaken, feelings of anxiety and depression are common symptoms of the struggle to adjust to the changing roles.
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  • Kareem Puranda

    Luxuries we take for granted…

    • Kareem Puranda
    Nov 26, 2012
    On the week of thanksgiving I visited a dentist because I was experiencing severe discomfort on the right side of my mouth every time I chewed. After running a few tests and x-rays, the doctor informed me that I had a fractured molar. The tooth had been damaged to the point where it agitated a nerve which also contributed to mild headaches and earaches. All of these conditions were caused by this fractured tooth which the doctor and I assumed was a result of habitual ice chewing. The doctor indicated that my safest option was to extract the tooth because it could potentially get infected since the tooth was fractured to the nerve. Talk about great timing… NOT! I became extremely concerned about my ability to eat on thanksgiving because I like to eat. I was bothered by not being able to enjoy the meals and desserts that are only prepared during the holidays. This concern prompted me to explore immediacy and the existential meaning behind this internal event. How did this one tooth make a significant impact among the other 31 that were ready and willing to entertain some thanksgiving grub and how does that apply to life in general? There was meaning in this moment….
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