ACA Blog

  • What NOT to say after you say hello…

    • Doc Warren
    Jan 30, 2013
    Most if not all of you realize that I am playing off Eric Berne’s seminal text’s titled “What do you say after you say hello?” If you are one of the few that has never read it I encourage you to drop everything, cancel your day’s sessions (if you didn’t already once you saw that I had published this blog) and read it cover to cover; if for no other reason than that it may make this blog title and blog itself all the more humorous. Go ahead, I can wait (Looking at my Ingraham pocket watch that was made right here in Bristol CT back when we didn’t send every job to China)…
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  • Which Comes First – Counseling or Sign Language?

    • Shannon Ruane
    Jan 30, 2013
    Since the submission of my last blog post about deaf individuals and some of their negative experiences in counseling, I have been seriously touched and somewhat humbled by the outpouring of communication I have received not only from counselors and counseling students; but also from deaf and hard of hearing individuals themselves.
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  • Setting Expectations in Line with Reality

    • Grace Hipona
    Jan 30, 2013
    This was a quote that I heard during my masters program several years ago now, and it has stuck with me ever since. Whether we are working with a client, supervisee, or student or in our personal lives, this can be applied. Of course, as with any words of advice, it is easier said than done. Several examples come to mind in my work with all those listed above.
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  • Horses as Counselors: Therapeutic Vaulting

    • Lisa Krystosek
    Jan 30, 2013
    This is an area of Therapeutic Horsemanship that I find to be fascinating. When I think of vaulting on horseback, the image of superhuman gymnasts in Cirque du Soleil-like performances springs to my mind. The more I researched the topic, however, the more I realized the value it brings to clients participating in Therapeutic Horsemanship programs. The balance, focus, confidence and teamwork it takes to perform the exercises during a Therapeutic Vaulting session can be extremely beneficial not only in a physical sense, but also psychologically.
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  • A year "without a face" - how current situations can bring back painful memories.

    • Doc Warren
    Jan 30, 2013
    Last I checked we are all humans, sure we are highly trained and highly skilled humans but no amount of formal education, certifications and licensure can take the human out of human service providers. Though we know how to work through our issues and seek the assistance of other clinical professionals as needed, there are times when well buried or long forgotten issues can be triggered by a client, situation or event. How we deal with those issues can make or break us as clinical professionals. It can also help us better understand our client’s reactions to things as well, should we look at and understand our own reactions.
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  • Counseling Internships: Help has Arrived

    • Ryan Thomas Neace
    Jan 30, 2013
    Over the past few years it dawned on me that there are close to 1000 counseling education programs in the US – over 600 of them CACREP-accredited. That’s tremendous! What’s more, literally every student in every program must go through an internship. The American Counseling Association estimates that it has approximately 20,000 student members! Yet, for all of these realities, until now there has been no resource on the web for students to find counseling internships. That just didn’t seem right.
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  • Severely Impoverished

    • Pat Myers
    Jan 29, 2013
    This weekend my husband and I were watching our favorite morning show ‘Up with Chris Hayes’. I like this show because it makes me think. Each weekend intelligent, interesting, and well-informed people discuss the issues. I can almost feel my brain gaining density as I listen to the conversation. In the last segment of the show four fiction authors were the focus. Ayana Mathis, author of ‘The 12 Tribes of Hattie’, used the term ‘severely impoverished’ in making her point.
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  • Short Term Memory Loss and the Power of Implicit feelings

    • Lee Kehoe
    Jan 29, 2013
    It is interesting that whenever someone asks me what population I work with, and I mention older adults, in my experiences the first thing many people then ask about has something to do with memory loss or dementia. It seems as though there is a widespread association between older individuals and memory loss. I have also encountered individuals who often assume that all of my clients have Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, in my experiences many people seem to then conclude that individuals with such memory loss, Alzheimer’s disease or other forms of dementia could not benefit from counseling.
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  • Will the Real Self Please Stand Up?

    • Ray McKinnis
    Jan 29, 2013
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  • Teachable moments

    • Stephen Ratcliff
    Jan 29, 2013
    “I’m an awful parent” is a common lament of many of the parents I work with professionally. These parents will enter my office with anger and regret tattooed from face to toes. A child or teen is commonly tugged in their wake, head downcast. Meeting individually with these parents to check-in regarding the cause of their disparaging facade, they commonly spill forth tales of their child’s becoming quite the little terror recently, to which they with all the heaviness of an over-stressed individual, responded in anger, only to deeply regret it later.
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