ACA Blog

Dec 27, 2013

Letters to a Young Therapist

On the last day of my graduate internship this past spring, my supervisor gave me a copy of Mary Pipher’s book, “Letters to a Young Therapist.”  Dr. Pipher shares the insight she has gained from thirty years of experience as a therapist, working with a clientele ranging from adolescents to intricate families.  Her witty words seem to have a storybook effect on the reader, which makes it hard to put the book down.  I recently spotted the book on my shelf and felt compelled to share a couple of the refreshing and relatable passages.

For me, the best trick is to not have tricks. When I attempt to be clever or sophisticated, I often confuse myself and my clients. Once when I suggested what I thought was a brilliant, rather mysterious, homework assignment, my client asked me if I was on drugs. Another time when I predicted the future in an attempt to generate a self-fulfilling prophecy, my client looked at me in the eyes and said bluntly, “If you can predict the future, you ought to go to Vegas.”

Here’s one that I think other counselors (and fellow ACA bloggers) may be able to relate to on a personal and professional level:

As a way to deal with her intense grief, I recommended that she write. I said, “For me, writing is the best therapy. I don’t know how people who don’t write survive.” For many years, I wrote in the mornings and did therapy in the afternoon. Both jobs involve spending time in small rooms waiting for inspiration. And both possess a considerable amount of mumbo-jumbo. The tools of our trade include our intuition, intelligence, warmth, and character structures. Overtime, competent writers and therapists develop a voice. Work done with a true voice looks natural and easy to observers.

What books have impacted the way you perceive your career? I’d love to hear your thoughts!
________________________________________________________________________
Sadaf Siddiqi is a certified counselor with an interest in mental health research and its application to children and families. Please share your thoughts with her at ssiddi12@jhu.edu

Contact Name

Contact Title

Contact Email

Contact Phone

Related Info

1 Comment

  1. 1 Maya Georgieva 28 Dec
    I just finished this book! So much wisdom. I will look for the rest of her books. Definitely a book to go back to!

Comment

  1. RadEditor - HTML WYSIWYG Editor. MS Word-like content editing experience thanks to a rich set of formatting tools, dropdowns, dialogs, system modules and built-in spell-check.
    RadEditor's components - toolbar, content area, modes and modules
       
    Toolbar's wrapper 
     
    Content area wrapper
    RadEditor's bottom area: Design, Html and Preview modes, Statistics module and resize handle.
    It contains RadEditor's Modes/views (HTML, Design and Preview), Statistics and Resizer
    Editor Mode buttonsStatistics moduleEditor resizer
      
    RadEditor's Modules - special tools used to provide extra information such as Tag Inspector, Real Time HTML Viewer, Tag Properties and other.
       

Join/Reinstate Your ACA and Division Memberships Today

  • Maximize your Professional Development
  • Learn more about your specialty—join a division
  • Stay ahead of the educational learning curve
  • Advocate for the counseling care of tomorrow
  • Expand your networking connections

Learn More

Join Now!
HPSO