ACA Blog

  • Haylee Wilson

    Group Counseling

    • Haylee Wilson
    Sep 10, 2012
    One of my greatest frustrations is group work. As a college student, high school student, and even an elementary school student I remember lamenting with my friends about group work, to which we were very averse. “Someone always does all the work and the rest of the group members get the credit.” “I can’t stand my group. None of us get a long.” “Group work is ridiculous. We will never work in groups in real life. We will only work by ourselves.” Such were some of the comments said by either myself or others. Today, it amazes me how wrong we were and that all along our teachers were right.
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  • Witnessing the Group Process

    Apr 05, 2012
    [caption id="attachment_4859" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Jennifer Bingaman"][/caption] I’m sure it’s no surprise, but working at a residential drug treatment center can be interesting. We have a bunch of grown men living side-by-side all trying to work through some heavy issues along with their addiction. We have anger and apathy. We have motivation and we don’t. We have a good proportion of Axis IIs intermingling with people who have never had to understand something like a personality disorder. It’s an adventure in understanding for staff and clients most days.
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  • Jaime Castillo

    Challenges To Counseling Clients In Their Homes

    • Jaime Castillo
    Jan 31, 2011
    I provide individual counseling in a group home on a weekly basis, and with that responsibility comes some interesting challenges. When I first started working at this residence the supervisor provided me with a tour of the house and showed me the room that was given to the .clinicians. It was a your standard first floor living room with a couple couches some plants and a TV. For the first few weeks I met with all individuals in this room, but not without some difficulty. I had one client who was particularly hesitant to join me in this room week after week.
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  • Jaime Castillo

    Learning Group Psychotherapy for Adults with Mental Retardation

    • Jaime Castillo
    Jan 24, 2011
    In a previous entry “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Client,” I discussed methods of providing individual psychotherapy with adults diagnosed with mental retardation. It’s not a surprise that we must also modify our traditional therapeutic techniques with this population when facilitating groups. Each week I run a group comprised of adults with mental retardation and co-morbid psychiatric diagnosis, and have been trained in the “Integrative-Behavioral Model” for group psychotherapy, as developed by Dr. Dan Tomasulo. Working with this population can be difficult. Not only are we faced with the MR and co-morbid psychiatric disorders, but also we are challenged by the numerous cognitive and social skill deficits these clients face.
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  • Kimberly Beck

    Self-Injury Group

    • Kimberly Beck
    Dec 07, 2010
    In October, 2010 in Akron Ohio I had the great pleasure of presenting to the self-injury group and working closely with the girls in the group. The term self-injury was used no matter what the method of self-injury the girls used, because the girls found the exact terms such as cutter or burner etc. was too triggering. They were still actively involved in self-injury and were looking for ways to deter themselves from self-injury and help them cope with overwhelming feelings.
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  • Linda Magnelli

    Is It A Group Or A Class??

    • Linda Magnelli
    Nov 30, 2010
    As a substance abuse counselor, I hear many of my clients refer to our group sessions as “classes”. This made me start thinking about what the difference is between them. When I think of groups, I think of a safe environment that has a “give-and-take” approach where members can explore their knowledge about a given subject, and share areas of their lives that need help. When I think of classes, I envision a set curriculum that allows for discussion but no departure from the original material. Groups rely on a counselor to guide them to knowledge and how to apply a set of tools to their lives. Classes depend on an educator to teach information, but not necessarily how to make that information become their own.
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  • Matt Krauze

    Anonymous Secrets And Group Counseling

    • Matt Krauze
    Oct 18, 2010
    “How did it go?” “Really well. They have a lot more in common than they know.” -October 2009, used in a freshmen college group of 23 students. A group of my friends in the same peer facilitation class in undergrad developed a great tool that works within the group setting. Often, in the beginning, members of a group are hesitant to include others in their personal space. It really depends on personality and temperament of the each person, but many members are less than thrilled to start exploring their feelings, concerns, and hopes to the rest of the group. If you happen to have a talented and caring group leader, then you’re that much better off. It’s a continual work in progress though.
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  • Matt Krauze

    Does the Group Dynamic Fumble?

    • Matt Krauze
    Oct 04, 2010
    Recently I attended an alumni/ current student event at my undergraduate college. My main reason for going was to see some of my fellow classmates who had just recently graduated. After I had time to reconnect with some good friends and learn what types of interesting things they were doing, I started to notice the current students and how the group mentality was functioning in this social outing. Then I remembered how I was invited to the event.
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  • Hello, Group Therapy. It's Been Amazing Getting to Know You.

    • Courtnay Veazey
    Jun 02, 2010
    My university offers a Maymester, which is a three week semester. It's quite amazing actually. You attend class Monday – Friday for three hours every day, and in three weeks, you have another 3-hour credit out of your way. It was the first Maymester I've ever done in my academic career, and I thoroughly enjoyed it thanks to my wonderful colleagues and professor. The class I completed was Group Techniques and Procedures, and as part of the course, we experienced being a group member. And, let me say, I fell in love with group therapy over the past three weeks.
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  • Ballerina Counselor

    • Courtnay Veazey
    May 20, 2010
    I mentioned in an earlier post that one of my life roles is a ballerina. I love ballet. It is my heart, passion, de-stressor, and avenue of worship. Now, you may wonder, how does ballet relate to counseling? I've reflected on that question several times in the process of creating my professional identity. Here are some of my personal reflections.
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