ACA Blog

  • Children and Psychoeducation: Yes, No, Maybe?

    • Maya Georgieva
    Jan 13, 2014
    I was leading a children’s process group. Everything was going smoothly until a middle-schooler shared a racially offensive remark he heard at school. First there was silence, then - giggles. I looked around. I saw a few frustrated faces.
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  • The Power of Play

    • Sadaf Siddiqi
    Jan 03, 2014
    “You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation.” Plato, the philosopher, said this around 400 B.C. The concept of playing to learn has been around for centuries. However, only in the past couple of decades has play become a powerful and regular form of child therapy.
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  • Sibling Struggles

    • Sadaf Siddiqi
    Nov 20, 2013
    There’s no denying that parents of children with autism fight a tough battle – but what about their “typically developing” siblings? Some researchers believe that siblings of children with special needs often possess more patience than usual; however, ending up at this feat is not an easy journey for most of them. While counseling children living with a sibling with autism, I have found a few issues that commonly come up in conversation.
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  • Simple Strategies for Approaching Autism

    • Sadaf Siddiqi
    Nov 12, 2013
    The word autism generally seems to cause a great deal of anxiety when mentioned. I find this to be particularly true of counselors who have not had the opportunity (or pleasure, in my opinion) to work with children on the autism spectrum. The latest and fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) has recently developed new criteria for evaluating autism. Regardless of the changes, I’ve found certain consistencies to be beneficial in the counseling process when working with this population.
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  • When Depending on External Approval

    • Alejandra Delgado
    Oct 28, 2013
    We all have opinions. We are constantly sharing ours and asking for others’, but how much is too much? Would our lives be different if we wouldn’t listen to others? Would someone else’s life be different if we wouldn’t have shared what we thought about a certain aspect of their life whether it was for better or worse? Would we have picked an alternative career, job, or even life partner if we had or hadn’t listened to others? Why is it that we need the constant approval from others? Most likely, since our early years we were socialized to constantly look for some kind of external recognition instead of internal ones.
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  • Acting Big for a Little

    • Alejandra Delgado
    Sep 20, 2013
    I work for a non-profit organization called Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS). BBBS's mission is to create one-on-one mentoring relationships for at-risk children, “Littles”, through carefully monitored and supported matches. I co-run the school program in which “Bigs” meet with their “Littles” at the little’s schools during their lunch time, elective hour, or after-school program. I love my job because I am able to pair up children with a friend that also acts as a guide in different areas of their lives.
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  • Grieving Mothers

    • Deb Del Vecchio-Scully
    May 13, 2013
    “Let’s get over it and move on” is a comment left on an article in memoriam to those who lost their lives at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in today’s newspaper. If only it was that simple, if only there could be a magic wand that would miraculously take away the pain and traumatic grief for those spending Mother’s Day without their children today.
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  • Family First

    • Andrea Holyfield
    Feb 26, 2013
    Recently I had the honor and pleasure to speak to a group of courageous young women ages 14 -19 about my life and experiences as a teen mother. I was invited by Family First, an organization in downtown Atlanta that provides counseling and assistance to young pregnant and teen moms. I was ecstatic about the opportunity to speak with this group of women of course because even 20 years later I still identify myself as a teen mom.
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  • Severely Impoverished

    • Pat Myers
    Jan 29, 2013
    This weekend my husband and I were watching our favorite morning show ‘Up with Chris Hayes’. I like this show because it makes me think. Each weekend intelligent, interesting, and well-informed people discuss the issues. I can almost feel my brain gaining density as I listen to the conversation. In the last segment of the show four fiction authors were the focus. Ayana Mathis, author of ‘The 12 Tribes of Hattie’, used the term ‘severely impoverished’ in making her point.
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  • Teachable moments

    • Stephen Ratcliff
    Jan 29, 2013
    “I’m an awful parent” is a common lament of many of the parents I work with professionally. These parents will enter my office with anger and regret tattooed from face to toes. A child or teen is commonly tugged in their wake, head downcast. Meeting individually with these parents to check-in regarding the cause of their disparaging facade, they commonly spill forth tales of their child’s becoming quite the little terror recently, to which they with all the heaviness of an over-stressed individual, responded in anger, only to deeply regret it later.
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