Research

Research


Friday, March 28
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Program ID #410, Poster Area 10
Resiliency, Disability, and Coping: The Development of a Resiliency Intervention

30-Minute Poster Session
Susan Stuntzner, Michael T. Hartley 
Resiliency is a topic that has generated increased interest among counseling and psychology professionals in recent years. Resiliency is presently considered something that people need to deal with and overcome challenging life events. Living with a disability is a situation that often exposes the person to many challenging and unpleasant obstacles, barriers, and social stigmas that go beyond the disability. Due to the plethora of negative messages and situations encountered, many persons with disabilities may find it helpful to increase their resiliency-based skills. The resiliency intervention presented at this session was developed to help meet this need.


Friday, March 28
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Program ID #411, Poster Area 11
Implementing School-Based Mental Health Services To Improve School Climate and Prevent Violence in At-Risk Youth

30-Minute Poster Session
Kevin Curtin 
Given cuts in state mental health programs as well as the demand for increased mental health services in schools, there is a tremendous need to create programs and practices that address school safety and preventative mental health services. This poster examines school climate and provides an overview of an innovative school-based mental health program for at-risk youth that supports the findings of positive school climate and includes school-wide positive behavioral supports within a therapeutic community.


Friday, March 28
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Program ID #414, Poster Area 14
Theory and Efficacy of Wilderness Therapy: Mechanisms of Change and Long-term Outcomes

30-Minute Poster Session
Sean Roberts, Steven DeMille 
Wilderness therapy is a relatively new and increasingly popular treatment approach for emotionally and behaviorally troubled adolescents and young adults. There is a limited, though growing evidence base for wilderness therapy, and the current data suggests promising results. This poster will review wilderness therapy theory and methods, and extrapolate findings from a large outcome study at four wilderness programs. We will examine short and long-term outcomes by diagnoses and demographic variables such as gender, parents’ marital status, adoption, age, and ethnicity. We will explore the mechanisms of change, for whom this approach works best, and how clients transition out of intensive residential treatment.


Friday, March 28
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Program ID #421, Poster Area 5
First Responders and Mental Health: What's Missing?

30-Minute Poster Session
Lauren Bussey, Joel Diambra 
This poster details research related to the ongoing stress of first responders that can lead to substantial mental health issues. Lack of participation and stigma within the first responder culture correlates with mental health services having trouble aiding this population effectively. The presenters will discuss literature associated with first responders’ mental health issues and discuss how counselors can become more effective agents of change for first responders. 


Friday, March 28
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Program ID #425, Poster Area 9
The Asian Values Scale-Revised: Are We Measuring Asian Values, or Something Else?

30-Minute Poster Session
John Gruenewald, Jeannie Eamnarangkool 
Examining Asian values is essential for clinicians and researchers working with Asian populations. This study examined the Asian Values Scale–Revised (AVS-R; Kim et al., 1999) and its ability to measure Asian values with Japanese and Japanese-American cultural groups and to compare them to European Americans. Data were collected from different communities and areas in both the United States and Japan. The three cultural groups completed the values scale. The results of the study suggest that the AVS-R may not be effective at measuring Asian values specific to Japanese individuals. Implications for future study and clinical practice will be presented.


Friday, March 28
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Program ID #427, Poster Area 11
Interparental Conflict, Depression, and Preschooler Psychopathology: Examining Mediating Risk and Protective Factors

30-Minute Poster Session
Tina D. Du Rocher Schudlich 
This poster examines the ways in which interparental conflict and depression may place children at risk for psychopathology during the early childhood years. The short- and long-term impact of these on infants and preschoolers are discussed, and risk and protective factors specific to children and their families are explored. Specific interventions for child and family counselors are highlighted. For example, counselors will learn intervention strategies for helping young children coping with family conflict and they will learn how to help families minimize the impact that conflict has on young children. Counselors will learn which elements of everyday interparental conflict are most detrimental and which ones may actually benefit children.


Friday, March 28
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Program ID #428, Poster Area 12
The Relationship Between Parental Involvement and School Violence: A Correlational Study

30-Minute Poster Session
Zachary Pietrantoni 
School violence has been a major concern of policymakers, school practitioners, and the public health department. Previous research has studied the risk factors associated with school violence (i.e., childrearing, socioeconomic status, community violence, and attachment). Despite the research on parental involvement and youth performance in school, there is no literature discussion about the possible association between parental involvement and school violence incidents. Therefore, this study examines the relationship between parental involvement and school violence incidents. Research and implications for school violence prevention will be provided. Come join the discussion and help prevent school violence.


Friday, March 28
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #436, Poster Area 4
Perfectionism and Acculturative Stress among Turkish International Students

30-Minute Poster Session
Suleyman Akcil, Philip B. Gnilka 
International students confront numerous challenges when studying at U.S. universities. Acculturative stress has been a key interest, plus the factors that reduce or exacerbate acculturative stress within specific subgroups of international students. Some recent research has investigated personality factors including perfectionism. This poster examines the effects of perfectionism and acculturative stress in predicting depression in a sample of 174 Turkish international graduate students studying in the U.S.. Implications for counselors and results of several clinical intervention studies also will be presented.


Friday, March 28
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #437, Poster Area 5
Meeting the Unfamiliar: Making the Existential Experience Part of the Supervision Process

30-Minute Poster Session
L. Marinn Pierce, Amanda K. Sortwell 
Supervisees describe feelings of aloneness and isolation at various points throughout their development. This poster will review the findings of a phenomenological study exploring the existential experiences of supervisees. As it is important that counseling supervisors acknowledge and work through these experiences, supervisors will be provided with information regarding the existential experiences of supervisees and given information regarding specific skills and techniques to support and assist supervisees through these crises.


Friday, March 28
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #438, Poster Area 6
Family Adjustment: Scale Construction of the FAM-II

30-Minute Poster Session
Jennifer Elena Gonzalez 
The purpose of this study was to conduct a factor analysis of the FAM-II, which was developed to measure family adjustment to parents of children without special needs based on four possible domains (Social Support, Positive Coping Skills, Family and Marital Adjustment, and Effective Parenting). Concurrent validity with the Relationship Assessment Scale also was examined. These parents were participants in a federally funded relationship education course. The researchers examined two research questions in this study: How many different factors are needed to explain the pattern of relationships among the 30 items on the Family Adjustment Measure-II? And, what is the nature of those factors?


Friday, March 28
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #442, Poster Area 10
Sense of Purpose Scale: A Validation Study

30-Minute Poster Session
Zi Young Kang 
Purpose refers to a stable and generalized intention to accomplish something that is meaningful to the self and of consequence to the world beyond the self (Damon, Menon, & Bronk, 2003). Many empirical studies have demonstrated the positive role of purpose. Yet, remarkably little empirical work has investigated the development of purpose or ways to foster purpose among young people. The presenters will introduce the Sense of Purpose Scale that was designed to be a brief measure for evaluation of interventions and for various research purposes. Information about the scale development process and the psychometric properties of the scale will be provided. We also will discuss ways in which counselors can enhance people’s sense of purpose.


Friday, March 28
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #443, Poster Area 11
Examining Relationships Between Proactive Coping and Post-Traumatic Growth in Experiences of Anticipatory Grief

30-Minute Poster Session
Kylie Rogalla 
This poster is a report of preliminary findings from a dissertation study examining the experiences of anticipatory grief in family members who have a loved one in hospice care. The primary variables under investigation include proactive coping (IV), post-traumatic growth (DV), and social support (mediator). The study is grounded in Grief to Personal Growth Theory and fosters a strength-based approach to grief and loss work, as opposed to the deficit “grief as a dysfunction” approach. Learn of the preliminary results in this investigation and gain ideas for working with anticipatory grief in clients they serve. The significance of proactive coping dispositions and the role of social support will be discussed.


Friday, March 28
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Program ID #455, Poster Area 7
Trans-ing the Binary: A Phenomenological Study of Gender Identity and Gender Expression

30-Minute Poster Session
Carol Doyle, Margaret H. Eichler 
Throughout their lives, transgendered folks trans- or cross the boundaries and assumptions that society has about gender. For some, this trans-ing involves crossing the borders of traditional gender categories, living in the world and creating their own gender identity/expression beyond the tethers of a binary conceptualization. This poster presents findings from a phenomenological study of the lived experiences of people who are trans-ing the binary. Findings include participants’ understanding of their own gender identity, gender expression, gender fluidity, and sexual orientation. Participants’ experiences of not conforming to societal gender norms and societal reactions to their gender atypicality also are presented.


Friday, March 28
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

AARC Session
Program ID #459, Poster Area 11
Utilizing Experts To Construct an Instrument: A Delphi Study To Construct a Measure for Spiritual Competence in Counseling

30-Minute Poster Session
Christopher Christmas 
Learn to conduct a Delphi study, a technique used to address complex problems with inherent uncertainty. At a basic level, the Delphi technique is a form of structured group communication in which the researcher determines the investigative focus. The presenters will describe a Delphi study conducted using online surveying software for three rounds of data collection plus a round for feedback from the Delphi panelists about the study. Issues covered include determining the experts, assembling the Delphi panel, communicating with panelists, and analyzing and reporting qualitative and quantitative data. The poster covers strengths, limitations and implications for future studies using the Delphi method.


Friday, March 28
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Program ID #468, Poster Area 4
The Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

30-Minute Poster Session
Elizabeth A. Prosek, Jessica M. Holm 
Students enrolled in counseling courses are not immune to the mental health distress of the normal graduate student population. In this session, required counseling services for counseling students are presented as a preventative intervention to promote positive mental health and wellness. You are empowered to consider the infrastructure and potential ethical dilemmas for such a requirement. Results of an empirical study are used to support how required counseling was beneficial for first-semester counseling students.


Friday, March 28
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Program ID #474, Poster Area 10
Thought Suppression and Mindfulness: A Randomized Controlled Study

30-Minute Poster Session
Danielle Richards 
The research entailed a randomized control experiment using an innovative, brief mindfulness intervention with undergraduate college students. There was a significant difference for the treatment group, showing a decrease in thought suppression when compared to the control group. This is meaningful because typical mindfulness training programs are of a longer duration. A brief intervention may be more amenable to implementation by college personnel and more amenable to undergraduate students' busy schedules. Partial funding for this research was provided by a grant from the American College Counseling Association and from a grant provided by Chi Sigma Iota Counseling Academic and Professional Honor Society International.


Saturday, March 29
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Program ID #507, Poster Area 7
Cost of Caring: Understanding Characteristics, Challenges, and Stresses of Parents of Service Members After Warzone Deployment

30-Minute Poster Session
Carol Doyle 
After returning from deployment in Iraq or Afghanistan, many troops need assistance in readjusting to civilian life, including care in their recovery from physical or psychological injuries. For many young veterans, this caring and supports falls primarily on their parents. However, service member parents have received only minimal attention in respect to their experience of supporting their sons and daughters after deployment. This poster presents findings from a survey on the costs of caring on parents of service members and veterans. Included will be results regarding the types of support they are providing their children as well as the coping strategies used by parents as they help their returning veterans reintegrate into society.

Saturday, March 29
11:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Program ID #510, Poster Area 10
Being Bullied in School: Experiences of Students Who Identify as LGBTQ

30-Minute Poster Session
Mandi Gordon 
Sexual orientation is the second most common reason that students get bullied in school, and LGBTQ students report being bullied and feeling unsafe at school more frequently than their heterosexual counterparts. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the negative experiences that students who self-identify as LGBTQ have had with regards to bullying related to their perceived or actual sexual orientation. Five semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants who self-identify as LGBTQ. Three themes were identified: transformation through storytelling, the many forms of bullying, and supportive and non-supportive factors. Findings and reflections of the process will be presented.


Saturday, March 29
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Program ID #526, Poster Area 10
Examining Counseling Research Related to Poverty: A Content Analysis on Poverty in Counseling Journals

30-Minute Poster Session
Jamie S. Carney, Sarah Kitchens, Mary Francis, Simone May 
It is essential that counseling and counselor education address socioeconomic status (SES) as a dynamic in all areas of counseling, advocacy, and social justice (ACA, 2005; CACREP, 2009). This poster will discuss the findings of a content analysis of counseling journals (last 10 years, ACA journals [10], ASCA, AMHC) that focused on addressing SES. Specific emphasis was on addressing poverty and lower SES. The poster will outline findings of the analysis with a consideration of limitations and areas of concern. The poster also will discuss changes over time and areas for training consideration. Resources and materials related to addressing these issues in diversity, advocacy, and social justice training will be provided.


Saturday, March 29
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #535, Poster Area 3
Counseling College Seniors Through the Transition Out of College: Applying Theory and Research to Practice

30-Minute Poster Session
Joel A. Lane, Dena Elghoroury 
The senior year of college represents a significant transition, during which individuals prepare to leave behind the freedom of the college experience and to assume ownership of adult roles. Recent research suggests that many of today’s college seniors are experiencing distress and reduced well-being regarding their ability to transition into career life, develop new support networks, and leave behind the freedom of the student lifestyle. This poster will focus on the psychological implications of the graduation transition. The presenter will use his own research and clinical experience to provide attendees with a framework for understanding and working with seniors to promote well-being and successful transitions out of college.


Saturday, March 29
1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Program ID #542, Poster Area 10
An Investigation into the Contribution of School Counselors’ Well-Being and Self-Efficacy in Relation to Service Delivery

30-Minute Poster Session
Patrick Mullen 
This poster outlines a research investigation that examined the contributions of school counselor’s wellbeing and self-efficacy regarding their service delivery. Learn about the literature supporting this research, the research methodology and data analysis employed, the results of the study, and implications for practice and research. Handouts will be provided.


Saturday, March 29
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Program ID #549, Poster Area 1
The Role of Client Dispositional Optimism in Promoting Career Counseling Process and Outcomes

30-Minute Poster Session
Stephanie Crockett 
Past research suggests that dispositional optimism may be an influential factor in client career development and overall well-being. However, few studies address how client dispositional optimism impacts the career counseling process and outcomes. This poster will provide an understanding of how client dispositional optimism influences the therapeutic working alliance and career counseling outcomes. Findings from a recent study concerning client optimism in a clinical counseling setting will be presented. Evidence-based implications and practices will be provided for counselor educators, supervisors, and practitioners.


Saturday, March 29
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

Program ID #559, Poster Area 11
Distress in Male Caregivers of Breast Cancer Patients: The Role of Shame

30-Minute Poster Session
Sarah Dihmes, Elaine Song 
This study explored the role of shame as a part of male caregiver distress. Research shows that as many as 30% of cancer patient spouses experience depression (Blanchard, Albrecht, & Ruckdeschel, 1997) and that caregivers are not being adequately supported (Hasson-Ohayon, Goldzweig, Braun, & Galinsky, 2010). Male caregivers often have difficulty discussing their concerns about their wives’ breast cancer and their fears about their wives’ mortality. Building upon current literature, the study examined possible correlations between shame and depression (prototypical and masculine), shame and role strain (new caregiving responsibilities), and shame and spouse’s stage of cancer.


Saturday, March 29
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.

CSI Session
Program ID #564, Poster Area 16
Advocacy and Leadership: An Investigation into the Perceptions of American Counseling Association Members

30-Minute Poster Session
Jill Dubendris, Melissa "Nikki" Freeburg 
This poster will feature the findings from a pilot study (funded by Chi Sigma Iota) that explored the perceptions of ACA members on professional advocacy. Explored elements included: perceived competence and knowledge, academic preparation, where responsibility lays, and the impact of professional leadership often being coupled with advocacy. Focus will be placed on how the findings compare to current literature that asserts that the proper advocacy priorities should be the profession before clients.


Saturday, March 29
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Program ID #568, Poster Area 4
Faculty Response to Emotionally Distressed Students: Supporting College Student Wellness Beyond the Counseling Center Walls

30-Minute Poster Session
Erica J. Seidel, Danna Ethan 
Trends in college mental health show an increase in severity of mental illness. Instead of using counseling services, many students confide in other trusted professionals on campus, often their professors. Many faculty members are unprepared to handle these complex mental health issues despite being asked to do so by students seeking their support. Counselors are in a unique place to provide mental health support not only as it is traditionally thought of within the walls of the counseling center, but also by providing training and support to professionals in the college community who are increasingly on the front lines of this issue. Learn concrete strategies and evidence-based resources designed to meet this goal.


Saturday, March 29
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Program ID #575, Poster Area 11
This Is Our Story: Understanding the Experiences of African American Clients in a Community Counseling Clinic

30-Minute Poster Session
Jessica Martin, Kathrina Nicole Cann 
As counselors, it is vital for us to understand what it is like to see and understand therapy through the eyes of our clients. Understanding how clients view the process of counseling helps us to better understand our clients, discover more effective counseling interventions, and increase our own worldview and awareness. As the body of knowledge focusing on client perceptions of mental health counseling grows, one area that is still considerably lacking is the voice of African Americans. This qualitative study looks at the experiences of African-American clients in a university community counseling clinic. This poster focuses on results of the research study and implications for counselors based on the research findings.


Saturday, March 29
3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

CSI Session
Program ID #580, Poster Area 16
Advocacy: Assessing Burnout and Organizational Activity as Support in Counselor Trainees and Early Professionals

30-Minute Poster Session
Amanda Tuohy, Samantha Ramsay 
Participation and/or professional organization membership might function as a protective factor against the experience of burnout on student interns in CACREP accredited mental health counseling programs (Valparaiso University, Purdue University, Indiana University), and post-graduates during their first two years of employment. Practice-based research offers opportunities for professional advocacy and program evaluation. This research is beneficial to analyze the potential for burnout in reference to quality of care and self-care in new mental health care professionals.

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Advance Rates Thru 2/15/14

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Evening: $125

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Day: $230
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