Individual Trauma and Disaster Mental Health

Individual Trauma and Disaster Mental Health


Friday, March 28
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

Traumatology Academy
Addictions Academy
Program ID #108, Room 319A-B
Finding Healing Through an Attachment-Focused Integrative Approach for Co-Occurring Substance Abuse and Trauma Treatment

60-Minute Session
Laura Anne Copley, Justin R. Watts 
Counselors and counselor educators involved in treatment provision, education, or research regarding substance dependence and trauma will learn how treatment outcomes may be influenced by how appropriately their co-occurring diagnoses are addressed. Supporting research on cultural and gender variations, neuroscience, and interpersonal traumatization, along with attendee and presenter experiences and case study applications, will be used to explore potential problems that can arise and adjustments to treatment that can be made.


Friday, March 28
10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Traumatology Academy
Creativity in Counseling Academy
Program ID #133, Room 323B
Mindfulness-Based Approaches with Post-Traumatic Disorder: Lessons Learned from 9-11 and the Sandy Hook School Shooting

90-Minute Session, Advanced
Deborah Del Vecchio-Scully 
The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder is significant affecting approximately 10% of the population. Rates are likely higher in Connecticut following Hurricane Sandy, October 2012, the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, December 2012 and the Boston bombings, April 2013. These events increased levels of hypervigilance present in already stressed communities following the September 11th terrorist attacks. This session offers a mindfulness-based approach to healing trauma including evidenced-based best practices of the expressive arts continuum such as mindfulness, art therapy and trauma-sensitive yoga.


Friday, March 28
3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

ACA Client-Focused Research Series
Research Academy
Traumatology Academy
Program ID #167, Room 306B
The Influence of Caregiver Intimate Partner Violence on Treatment Attrition for Child Sexual Abuse Victims

30-Minute Session
Leigh DeLorenzi 
This session presents research findings on the relationships between caregiver intimate partner violence, child posttraumatic stress, child cognitive self-development, and treatment attrition among child sexual abuse victims. The present research study results show that children with parents who confirmed past or current intimate partner violence were 2.5 times more likely to prematurely terminate from treatment. Recommendations for child advocacy centers and implications for further research are noted.


Friday, March 28
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Traumatology Academy
Creativity in Counseling Academy
Program ID #175, Room 316B
Unlocking Traumatic Memory: Four Expressive Techniques That Jump-Start the Trauma Story

60-Minute Session, Advanced
Jane Webber, J. Barry Mascari 
What can counselors do when talk therapy is at an impasse for clients with trauma? This session explores the power of expressive techniques in facilitating therapeutic disclosure and telling the trauma story. The presenters will demonstrate how to help clients use picture and digital story boards, graphic timelines, trauma containers, and three-dimensional sand tray scenes to jump-start the trauma story and help to reintegrate pieces of the trauma narrative especially when traditional therapy is not working. Case examples using multisensory expressive techniques with veterans and individuals with trauma will be discussed.


Saturday, March 29
10:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

ACA Counseling in Action Demonstration Series
Traumatology Academy
Program ID #224, Room 313A
Counselors Responding to Mass Violence Following a University Shooting: A Live Demonstration of Crisis Counseling

90-Minute Session
Stephanie F. Dailey, Jane Webber, J. Barry Mascari 
This live demonstration simulates crisis response following a hypothetical university shooting where counselors will engage affected individuals in the “hot zone.” The goals of this demonstration are to illustrate how counselors use de-escalation techniques to meet immediate needs for safety and stabilization of survivors as well as ameliorate intense emotional reactions. The second goal of this demonstration will be to demonstrate how the counselor will continue trauma interventions with a client who continues to experience acute posttraumatic symptoms following the incident. This session will show how to help the client identify sensory triggers evoking personal terror and learn to cope with feelings and reactions following mass violence.


Saturday, March 29
3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

ACA Client-Focused Research Series
Traumatology Academy
Program ID #267, Room 305A-B
Hurricane Katrina Seven Years Later

30-Minute Session
Kimberly N. Frazier 
Natural and person-made disasters impact the psychological functioning and everyday normalcy of those impacted by the event. After Hurricane Katrina, universities and surrounding communities served as symbols of normalcy; however, many institutions were forced to cut programs and staff in order to survive. This session will discuss research findings from a study conducted via interviews with faculty seven years after Hurricane Katrina, focusing on how their campuses have changed and the lessons learned seven years later. Implications for mental health counselors, disaster mental health, and future research will be discussed.


Saturday, March 29
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Traumatology Academy
Multicultural and International Counseling Academy
Program ID #285, Room 317B
Assessing the Needs of and Responding to Mexican Counselors Working with a Disaster-Affected Community

60-Minute Session
Laura Shannonhouse 
Tragedies occur everywhere. The 2009 ABC Daycare fire in Hermosillo, Mexico resulted in 49 infant and toddler deaths with an additional 60 seriously injured, traumatizing the whole community. Addressing the needs of such grieving populations can be challenging for counselors, resulting in secondary traumatic stress and burnout. This session will share the story of the Hermosillo community and the mental health responders. The needs of the responders regarding compassion fatigue were assessed and addressed. An explanation of this interdisciplinary collaboration (counseling, cultural anthropology, and psychology) is hoped to provide new perspective on how to help the helpers.


Sunday, March 30
7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.

Traumatology Academy
Program ID #305, Room 314
Disaster Play: Drama and Talk Therapy Meet Hurricane Sandy

60-Minute Session
Deanna Richards 
Join a drama therapist and mental health counselor in deconstructing the data collected during their work in Project Hope, FEMA's crisis counseling program to assist Hurricane Sandy survivors in NYC.


Sunday, March 30
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Traumatology Academy
Clinical Mental Health/Private Practice Academy
Program ID #333, Room 323B
The Neuroscience of Traumatic Stress: Why Talk Therapy Is Insufficient

90-Minute Session
Carol M. Smith, Julie Uhernik 
This session explains basic physiology of the triune brain, the fight/flight/freeze response, and other neurophysiological effects of acute trauma and chronic stress. Learn about the “second brain” in the gut, the cascading effects of cortisol and stress hormones, how the thinking brain “shuts down” during trauma, and how counselors can transcend talk therapy with clients who struggle to talk through or about their experiences. We describe a range of accessible, creative, experiential interventions to process and disarm distressing memories and emotions. The session explains how these approaches facilitate resilience, and overall well-being for clients, and for counselor inoculation against vicarious trauma.


Sunday, March 30
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Traumatology Academy
Wellness Academy
Program ID #361, Room 317A
Counseling Adventure Sports Participants: More than "Adrenaline Junkies"

60-Minute Session
Colin C. Ward, Erin Wenzel 
Counseling adventure sports participants (e.g. mountaineering, skydiving, white water rafting, cave diving, and other potentially dangerous activities) present unique challenges unaddressed in the field of mental health counseling. Adventure sports can also be dangerous, and when an accident or traumatic event occurs, the emphasis on planning and competence can impede the natural healing process associated with traumatic memories. Counselors are being called upon to assist adventure sports participants handle stress, trauma, grief, and decision-making. Since adventure sports are growing in popularity (Palmer, 2002), increased knowledge of this unique population is essential for counseling professionals.

Register Today!

Professional / regular
$480

New Professional / student / retiree
$345

Non-member Attendee
$615

Non-member student
$505

Register

Preconference Learning Institutes

Advance Rates Thru 2/15/14

Professional / regular
Day: $170
Evening: $125

New Professional / student / retiree
Day: $125
Evening: $100

Non-member Attendee
Day: $230
Evening: $185

Non-member student
Day: $185
Evening: $160

Register