About ACA

About ACA

The American Counseling Association is a not-for-profit, professional and educational organization that is dedicated to the growth and enhancement of the counseling profession. Founded in 1952, ACA is the world's largest association exclusively representing professional counselors in various practice settings.

What Is Counseling?

According to 20/20: A Vision for the Future of Counseling, the delegates comprised of 31 counseling organizations agreed upon a unified definition of counseling: Professional counseling is a professional relationship that empowers diverse individuals, families, and groups to accomplish mental health, wellness, education, and career goals.

Divisions, Branches, and Regions

There are 20 chartered divisions within the American Counseling Association. These divisions provide leadership, resources and information unique to specialized areas and/or principles of counseling.  ACA has four regions, which serves members in those regions.  Lastly, ACA has 56 chartered branches in the U.S., Europe, and Latin America.  Please click the following links to get more information about ACA's Divisions, Branches, and Regions.


Learn more about what ACA does for its members here.
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  • Advocate for the counseling care of tomorrow
  • Expand your networking connections
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Latest News

ACA in the News: Grieving Celebrities

by Amber McLaughlin | Aug 20, 2014
Dr. David Kaplan, ACA’s chief professional officer, spoke with The Huffington Post about how and why some people may be deeply affected by the death of a celebrity, as well as the impact of digital media.
There’s no rulebook when it comes to grief, explains Kaplan. "Grief is very different for different people. We have a tendency to compartmentalize grief and say that we should grieve a certain way depending on the person. But grief is grief and people act in very individual ways."

Read the full article here.